806 W. South Street (Boylan Heights)

Beautiful 1929 four-square style home in one of Raleigh’s great walkable historic neighborhoods – Boylan Heights.
South facing front porch. Cool original architectural details combined with modern updates. Fantastic original 3-bay garage. Gorgeous granite fireplace. Super livable full basement.  Easy access to many great places. Places like downtown Raleigh, Glenwood South, Dix Park, Pullen Park, NC State University, Farmers Market and more.  Active neighborhood events include Art Walk, Pumpkin Glow, Big Boylan Bash and again more.

For more on this property:

SurfRaleigh.com/806-w-south
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Restore Raleigh’s only surviving Lustron house to its sleek mid-century splendor! Fewer than 2,500 Lustron homes were built between 1947 and 1950 to answer America’s post-WWII housing shortage–only 35 were sold in North Carolina! View the history of the Lustron House below!

The current price reflects costs to date including disassembly and storage of panels, moving the house, engineering and site planning, new foundation, and the cost of the new lot.  For more information on Lustron Homes with history, listservs and other tidbits: http://www.ncmodernist.org/lustron.htm

The City of Raleigh is preparing a historic landmark designation report for the property. Once designated, the property taxes would be discounted by 50%. The designation report can also be used to initiate the nomination process to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The property may or may not be eligible for the NRHP because of its relocation. If the property is listed in the NRHP, then it may be eligible for state historic tax credits (15%). Both of these designations require re-assembly of the structure to occur first. Short-term no-interest rehabilitation loan up to $100,000 may be available. Inquire for more details.

 

The Raleigh Lustron was manufactured in 1949 and  is the Desert Tan two-bedroom Deluxe Westchester model featuring prefabricated enameled metal-panel walls and roof, aluminum tripartite casement windows, built-in pass-through metal China cabinet, bedroom vanity, and trellis downspout porch post. Moved from Gotno Farm on Buffaloe Road to a super-convenient downtown Raleigh location. Assembly required. View the amazing video of the Lustron House move through downtown Raleigh below!

More Lustron House History

When The Second World War had come to a close, America was facing changing trends in residential housing needs and philosophy, coupled with an ongoing housing crisis. Soldiers returning home from the war to the family, friends, and lives they had left only a few years before found a very different and unprepared nation not ready to meet the needs of the returning veterans. With a rising marriage rate and an even faster growing birth rate, the need for housing became even greater. In 1945, the national housing shortage totaled more than four million dwellings and the demand only increased with the GI Bill of Rights providing guaranteed home loans and mortgages to any veteran that had served at least 90 days in the service. Prepared to meet this need, Carl Strandlund, vice-president of the Chicago Vitreous Enamel Products Company, turned to the American domestic setting of the first part of the 20th century to play a significant role in the design and development of his product, the prefabricated porcelain enameled steel house. Strandlund hoped that the steel house, a concept first put forth by the steel industry at the 1933 Century of Progress Exposition in Chicago, would provide the government the ultimate reason to release steel to Chicago Vit.

Strandlund capitalized on the housing desires that had developed during the Progressive movement and incorporated these theories in the designs and floor plans of the Lustron homes so that they reflected the characteristics that had emerged as the predominant trends in residential construction prior to the war. His designs emphasized efficiency of space with easy to clean surfaces, smaller more functional and flexible rooms, a sanitary environment, and the inherently low maintenance of both the interior and exterior elements of the structure. The prefabricated steel house was in itself the technological innovation desired in new construction housing.

Excerpted from “The Steel House: A Sensationally Good Idea” by Stefan-leih [Kuns] Geary, December 2004 (Click here to read full article).

The Lustron House in North Carolina

The Lustron Corporation marketed and priced their product based on a national zone approach. Prices originally ranged between $4190 for the two-bedroom Newport to $7737 for the three-bedroom Westchester Deluxe, depending on what region of the country the product was sold in. These costs did not include the cost for foundation, utilities, or freight charges. In North Carolina, a Lustron home could be purchased for a price between $4440, again for the two-bedroom Newport, to $7087 for the three-bedroom Westchester Deluxe. Price varied even within the state of North Carolina.
According to Lustron Corporation documents, 35 Lustron Homes were sold within the state of North Carolina. Fetters has been researching the Lustron Home for over 20 years and has recorded the model, color and, when available, serial number of 2000 of the 2498 Lustron homes constructed in the United States. He has identified only 13 of the 35 that were constructed in North Carolina. Greensboro was home to three Westchester two-bedroom models. One of these was demolished in 2000. Of the two survivors, one has grey porcelain enamel siding and the other, blue siding with yellow trim. The unusual colors of the Lustron Home, designed by colorist Howard Ketchum, included dove gray, pink, surf blue, desert tan, maize yellow, blue-green, green and white and have become a trademark and a unique characteristic of the architecture and style of the product.

Excerpted from “The Steel House: A Sensationally Good Idea” by Stefan-leih [Kuns] Geary, December 2004 (Click here to read full article).

Click here to view the Lustron House Erection Manual.

Exuberant display of elaborate woodwork; picturesque setting on a hill among some of the finest homes in Warrenton!  Early 20th century homage to some of Warren County’s finest 19th century houses. It’s exuberant display of elaborate interior and exterior features run the gamut of Georgian, Federal and Greek Revival styles. Built in 1932 by Janice and Peter Seaman, who was in the lumber business and a skilled woodworker, the Seaman House is a testament to their appreciation of architectural refinement. Decades of neglect have resulted in severe water damage, collapsed back section and floors. The house will need all new electrical, plumbing and HVAC systems, structural repair, roofing, a new kitchen and bathrooms.  The house is located in the National Register district and may be eligible for tax credits.

Though the property is overgrown, the house and outbuildings fading, it doesn’t take much imagination to see the beauty and quality of the estate. The outstanding woodwork and spacious well-laid out rooms within a stately house situated on a slight rise with mature trees and boxwoods calls out to be preserved.

Warrenton is about a 1-hour drive from Raleigh via US Routes 1 or 401; an hour from Durham via I-85 and about two hours from Richmond, VA via I-95 to I-85.

Beautiful historic home, built in 1882 and restored in 2016. Conveniently located in downtown Catawba, this home boasts all of it’s 120-year-old charm with the conveniences of today. Move-in ready, the 4 bedroom, 2 bath home has beautifully maintained hardwoods, an updated kitchen, and fenced in backyard. History and craftsmanship are evident from the moment you walk through the front door.

The historic Thomas Walter Long House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Architectural and Historical Information

Two story, three bay “square house” with broad front porch and hip roof-symmetrically composed front elevation, with one story full façade porch with a gable covering an arch, the arch announces the center front door which is framed by narrow sidelights and a three part transom. Double hung sash windows with Queen Ann style upper sash flank the entrance behind the hip roof of the porch. A small hip roofed kitchen ell extends to the rear of the house where it abuts a porch. The building is sheathed in weatherboards.

The house was built for Samuel Carter Williams  (1878-1945), and his wife, Grace (Redman) Williams (1885-1961). Williams was a well-known local attorney and former mayor. In 1901 he was ordained a Methodist minister, but subsequently studied law and admitted to the bar in 1904. Two years later he established his practice in Yadkinville. He and his wife occupied the house until they died; it then passed on to son Thomas Lee Williams. S. Carter Williams and his sons, Joseph Redmond and Lafayette, all served in the state legislature. The elder Williams is credited with the enabling legislation for the first bridge between Yadkinville and Winston Salem across the Yadkin River.

Area Information

Yadkinville is centrally located in the heart of the Yadkin Valley wine country along the Yadkin County Quilt Trail   (www.visityadkin.com) and has a very active Arts Council with YARD (Yadkin Artists Residing Downtown). The S. Carter Williams House is close to downtown, post office, churches, Yadkin County Public Library and the Willingham Theatre — located in the brand new Yadkin Cultural Arts Center.  The 193- seat state of the art performance theatre offers movies and live performances throughout the year (www.yadkinarts.org).  Yadkinville conveniently located 30 minutes from Winston-Salem and 1 hour from Charlotte.

Owner financing may be available.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the S. Carter Williams House

S. Carter Williams House first floor plan

S. Carter Williams House second floor plan

 

The Caleb Savage House is located at 660 Union Branch Road in Gates County near the community of Corapeake, NC. Built in 1852 it remained in the hands of the original family until the current owner purchased the home and lovingly began the restoration process 10 years ago. The home is located on 3.3 quiet, rural acres with numerous outbuildings including an original slave quarter. Unique to this house is the original cypress siding, pine flooring, modern kitchen, master bath addition, and many mechanical updates. Original federal trim inside with 9 over 9 windows down, 12′ ceilings downstairs, plus front and back two story porches make this an ideal home for the preservationist.

The historic Caleb Savage House and Outbuildings are under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Historic 2,244 sq. ft. 3 bedroom, 2 bath home with formal dining room, 9′ 3″ ceilings and hardwood floors. Attached Porte Cochere and detached single-car garage. Wrap around porch/veranda. Sunporch and open floorplan with large eat-in kitchen. The house is located in the West Nash Historic District within a few steps from the desirable Cavalier neighborhood and walking/biking distance to the downtown commercial district. Permanent stairs to partially-finished attic not counted as livable space.

Partially renovated with a new roof using 30 year architectural shingles and new electric with underground wiring. Porte Cochere is scheduled for replacement in the coming weeks. As the house is not completely ready to move in yet, we will help you along the way with cost estimates for work still needed to be finished, Architectural blueprints, estimates and designer plans for kitchen and bath renovations and whatever else you might need.

Historic, charming and affordable homes are available in Wilson, NC. Wilson is pleasantly appealing in any season and offers an uncomplicated lifestyle.

Wilson’s location is ideal just 40 minutes from Raleigh, two hours from the beach, just under five hours to the mountains, an hour to the Raleigh-Durham International Airport, and half way between Miami and New York via I-95 or Amtrak. Wilson is home to two colleges, the state’s fastest fiber-optic Internet connections available in every home, tree-lined neighborhoods, five historic districts, a vibrant arts community and a roster of companies the envy to many metropolitan areas.

Beautiful Victorian on 4+ acres. Seven fireplaces with original mantles, beadboard, heavy moldings with traditional bullseye door and window details. Most original door hardware remain. Exterior covered with gingerbread porches and a second story balcony for sunset watching. Gorgeous foyer staircase with beautiful banister and several stained glass door inserts. A real treasure! Large hand-hewn barn and large garden space. Horses boarded close by.

The Tull-Worth-Holland House and associated outbuildings are a remarkably intact complex located just outside of Kinston. The main house is comprised of 3 distinct periods of the history of the farm, including the two-story 1825 Federal hall-and-parlor plan with enclosed stair. Around 1900, the front porch was expanded to wraparound, with Colonial Revival columns. The property also includes multiple outbuildings: a c.1945 two-car garage, c.1890 cooks house with common bond chimney, c.1880 barn, c.1870 stable, and c.1880 cotton gin, and an African American cemetery. The property will include approximately 10 acres, to be determined by survey at time of sale.

Architectural and Historical Information

The main house was built for Henry Tull who was one of the largest plantation owners in Lenoir County prior to the civil war. As his holdings expanded, the house became home to his overseer, J. W.C. Hill. Elegant Federal period detailing includes a mantel with a deep cornice and scallop detailing, which is repeated in the chair rail and mantel in the parlor. Further Federal elements retained include six-panel doors, three part mantels, chair rail and baseboards. In 1869, William Worth purchased the property for John Tull, Henry Tull’s son. Worth, a Quaker, was active in many of the agricultural organizations and was named State Business agent for the Farmers Alliance and moved to Raleigh. During Worth’s ownership, the house underwent its first major alteration which included the addition of rear shed rooms circa 1875, now serving as two bedrooms and a bath.  In 1898 Worth sold the property to J.W.C. Hill, the former overseer, who purchased it for his daughter and her husband, Jesse and Emily Holland. Around 1900, a kitchen ell was added to the back of the house, along with a side porch that feature a sink and water pump. The porch was enclosed around 1935, and a bath was added to the rear.

Area Information

Kinston is a town of about 22,000 located in eastern North Carolina, about an hour from Greenville and 1.5 hours to the Crystal Coast. This great small town has tons of big amenities, including Mother Earth Brewery, The Chef and the Farmer (the renowned restaurant of Chef Vivian Howard featured on PBS’s A Chef’s Life), The Woodman of the World Waterpark, a downtown business center under restoration and growing, the Down East Woodducks (minor league baseball team) who play in historic Grainger Stadium, Mother Earth Distillery, the C.S.S Neuse, and two boutique hotels — Mother Earth Motor Lodge and The O’Neil. With a location on the Neuse River, there are also plenty of opportunities for the outdoor lover to enjoy nature. Click here for more on downtown Kinston.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Tull-Worth-Holland House

 

Own a piece of history that has both charm and architectural perfection. In 1967 the new owners moved a Federal-Greek Revival historic home built in 1830 and conjoined it with a Williamsburg style home in Warsaw. The following information was excerpted from The Historic Architecture of Warsaw: ” A simple Federal I House with a one-story shed extension across the back, the structure exhibits elements of Greek Revival styling in the full façade shed porch and the reeded pilasters between the front door and its adjacent three paneled sidelights.” The house remained with the original owner’s family until 1967, when it was relocated by Dr. Mett B. Ausley.

The home features hardwood flooring throughout, has 5 bedrooms and 3.5 baths, living room, music room, office/study, dining room, and a large storage room that could be converted into awesome laundry room. There is also a large private screened in back porch.

The Leak House is a classic Colonial Revival style house designed by J.H. Hopkins, one of Greensboro’s most esteemed architects, and built in 1913. It is designated as a contributing structure in the Fisher Park National Register Historic District and eligible for federal and state historic preservation tax credits for qualifying rehabilitation expenses. The house is perched atop a hillside that rises from a stately granite retaining wall, all located on a generously-sized lot of almost half an acre on one of the city’s primary thoroughfares. A large, unfinished attic could be leveraged to boost total finished space to over 5,000 square feet. A large paved parking area is tucked behind the house. Uses for the home include: professional offices, upscale apartments, or a single-family residence.

This Arts & Crafts style home is move-in ready and has been exceptionally maintained by the Eisele family since 1945. It has been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. The home has 4 bedrooms and 3 & 1/2 bathrooms. Also of note are the 11′ ceilings down and 10′ ceilings up with 6 fireplace. The hand-carved woodwork throughout is beautiful as are the original lead windows with granite headers and sills. On the first floor you will find large pocket doors which open to create a space of approximately 35′ x 35′.

Wonderful Craftsman Bungalow located in a beautiful neighborhood, this gem is waiting to be restored to its former splendor!

Located just down the street from Herman Park, home to the local Farmer’s Market, the house features 3 bedrooms and 2 baths, with the potential for other rooms to be used as additional bedrooms. A large central foyer leads to the living room with stunning windows overlooking the back yard and a huge fireplace with beautiful wood mantel. The parlor to the left makes a wonderful dining room. The house also has a large kitchen, den with built-in bookcases, and a second story sunroom. The Sol Isaacs House also retains original hardwood floors, dentil crown molding, original fireplace mantels, a large front porch, and side screened porch.

Area Information

The lively town of Goldsboro (pop. 39,000) is the seat of Wayne County in eastern NC and is the home of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. It is a convenient 20 minutes from I-40 and I-95, one hour from Raleigh and New Bern, only 1.5 hours from Wilmington, and less than 2 hours to several of North Carolina’s beautiful beaches. The renovation of Union Station is underway with plans for the station to become a multi-modal transportation hub.  The station plans are scheduled to include light rail service from Goldsboro to Raleigh.

Rare NC example of 1840s Picturesque Cottage with decorative lattice porch, bay window and early woodwork. Bucolic location in front of scenic pond and adjacent to conservation farmland. Excellent BBQ nearby!

Architectural and Historical Information

Charming two story frame house  with  hall and parlor floor plan, is an architectural gem in Southern  Davidson County. Originally built in the early nineteenth century, a later renovation transformed it into a rare North Carolina example of a fashionable mid-nineteenth century picturesque “cottage” reminiscent of A.J. Downing’s  cottage designs.

The original small two-story frame house was built by either Doctor Robert Moore, the original grant holder, or his son Ebenezer, in the late eighteenth century or early nineteenth century. A two-story log addition was built early on. Ebenezer’s son-in-law Burgess Lamar Beall, a prominent physician and politician, transformed the house into a fashionable picturesque villa in the late 1840’s. Among the Federal-style mantels of the early house are the “Downing-esque” cottage features including latticework porch posts, decorative brackets, floor-length nine-over-nine sash windows, a large bay window off the side wall, and a double-leaf, raised-panel front entry with elaborate sidelights. The side wing was added during the picturesque villa remodeling and also featured latticework. The current one-bay wide porch was added in the twentieth century.

The house was moved several yards down the road to a 2.584 acre lot with access to a lovely small pond where the surrounding land on that side of the road will be protected by a conservation easement.  The house will require a complete rehabilitation including structural repair, restoration carpentry, new systems, bathrooms and kitchen.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for Beallmont.

Area Information

Linwood is a small community located between Salisbury and Lexington with close access to I-85.

Spectacular ONE-OF-A-KIND historic property on 5.5 wooded acres in highly desirable Apex, NC (Money Magazine’s #1 place to live in 2015) for sale by Capital Area Preservation with an historic preservation easement and rehabilitation agreement.

The c. 1905 Upchurch-Williams House is listed on the State Study List for the National Register of Historic Places and is in the process of designation as an Apex Historic Landmark (qualifies for a 50% property tax deferral). The two-story Queen Anne-style house features typical Victorian details, including a pyramidal roof and two front gables with vertical lapped fish scale wooden shingles, tall interior brick chimneys with corbelled caps, nine restored fireplaces, a protruding front bay with original windows and doors throughout, and a reconstructed and restored wrap-around front porch with slender Doric columns made of solid wood, tongue and groove pine flooring, and a new 5-V tin roof. The main roof is covered in original patterned metal shingles and is in excellent condition. The house also features an intact, unpainted second floor with original carbide light fixtures and flush beadboard walls and heart pine floors throughout. Stabilized and restored to its 1905 interior configuration, which consists of 10 rooms. Bathrooms, kitchen, and HVAC/plumbing/electrical to be installed by new owner. House is located in Wake County School district.

Will pay commission to buyer’s realtor.

Located deep in the NC Mountains, the C.N. West General Merchandise building was built around 1927 by Clyde and Minnie West using materials from the Old West Brothers Store which, at the time, was located across the street. The two-story frame structure would be ideal for retail, arts or studio space on the ground floor with a live-in area on the second. The downstairs was recently used as a pottery studio.

The property is listed as a contributing structure in the Cowee-West’s Mill National Register Historic District, including five outbuildings: root cellar, garage (with apartment above), log barn, wood shed, and barn. All of the buildings will require complete rehabilitation and all are contributing structures, making them eligible for rehabilitation tax credits.

Preservation North Carolina has previously worked with the Mainspring Conservation Fund to preserve important historic properties in Cowee. Important property documentation has already been completed, including: a home inspection report, well testing, termite inspection, Phase 1 and 2 environmentals, and title insurance.

The property is adjacent to the recently rehabilitated Aunt Vonnie West House and Post Office, Rickman’s General Store, and the Cowee School and Community Center.

Area Information

The Cowee-West’s Mill National Register Historic District is among the richest in the nation.  In the mid-18th century Cowee and the Little Tennessee River Valley was the central stage on which would determine the future of two nations: Cherokee and American.  The 370 acres in this historic district contain thousands of years of history and continues to resonate in the spiritual life of the Cherokees.  Cowee is only about 2 1/2 hours to Atlanta, 2 1/2 hours to Knoxville, less than two hours to the many attractions in Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge, and less than 45 minutes to Cullowhee, the home of Western Carolina University, and Cherokee.  Also nearby is the Great Smoky Mountain Railroad in Bryson City, NC.  The area is beautifully situated in the Nantahala National Forest, the largest of NC’s four National Forests.  The Nantahala National Forest is comprised of over 500,000 acres with elevations reaching 5,800 feet.  There are a wide variety of activities for visitors to enjoy, including whitewater rafting, camping, biking and horseback riding on over 600 miles of trails.  Learn more about the Nantahala National Forest by clicking here.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the C.N. West General Merchandise building

C.N. West General Merchandise ground floor plan

C.N. West General Merchandise second floor plan

C.N. West General Merchandise apartment floor plan

Early (built 1835), most intact farmstead in Johnston County. Only 30 minutes to Raleigh. Horses allowed. Additional land available for purchase separately.

Built and occupied by over four generations of the Tomlinson Family, Tanglewood is one of the finest intact farm complexes in Johnston County.  This spacious ‘L-shaped’ Federal/Greek Revival house was built for Bernice Harris Tomlinson upon his marriage to Elizabeth Walton in 1835.  The original two-story front and rear ell each have large double-shouldered chimneys, tall 9-over-6 windows, a wide central entry hall with fine woodgrained wainscoting and winder stair, and a rear service stair that provided access to the rear portion of the second floor until additional access and flow was added in the 1890s. The initials of John Harris Tomlinson, Bernice’s son, can be found in one of the chimney bricks on the southeast side. Likewise, a few names with dates can be found in the southeast parlor window.  The northwest parlor features tall plaster cornices and ceiling medallion, and excellent faux woodgraining on the doors and wainscot.

The house was enlarged in the 1870s by son John Harris, and again in the early 20th-century by grandson William David, resulting in a wide wrap-around porch, several wings and more “modern” outbuildings like car garages.

This early farmstead sits on almost 3.5- acres with a collection of outbuildings ranging from an 1830s gable storage building, an early 1830s smokehouse and a later 1870s smokehouse, a c.1879 kitchen/dining room (now attached by a porch), a few early 20th-century sheds, garages, bell tower, a caretaker’s cottage, and a c.1910 13-stall mule barn – the only one left in Johnston County.  Some of the early landscape features remain, including a grove of mature shade trees including walnuts and pecans along with a grove of elms and boxwoods planted as a wedding gift in 1861 to John Harris and Susan Wall Tomlinson.

Tanglewood will require a complete rehabilitation including cosmetic updates, new kitchen and bathrooms, repair/updates of the mechanical systems, chimney repair, and structural work for the “kitchen building.” The property is on the Study List for the National Register and may be eligible for tax credits once fully listed.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for Tanglewood

The two-story Victorian house was built in 1887 and is the only known surviving and intact building of the former 1880s Davis Military Academy, a military preparatory school.

A domed tower dominates the front entrance. The wrap-around porch is trimmed in decorative gingerbread molding. The double front doors with etched glass lead into a center foyer and hall which features a ships stern style screen and a 15-step staircase is anchored by a one piece carved walnut newell post.

Windows with stained glass surrounds are common to all the first floor rooms. Twin front parlors exhibit one room having 4 large 10’ windows with pegged sashes and the other room, a bay window.

Two interior brick chimneys accommodate seven fireplaces, two with marble mantels. The house is zoned for heating/cooling (gas pack; gas logs; wood stove). Other features include heart pine floors throughout, decorative woodwork and raised panel doors. 12’ ceilings are common to most of the 3800 sq. ft. house. There are two full baths on the first floor and one full bath on the 2nd floor. The updated kitchen includes stainless steel appliances with soapstone kitchen countertops. All renovations and updates have been sensitive to the original personality of the house.

This very solid house retains its original slate roof along with a new (2010) terne tin porch roof. The property includes a two-car shelter and a Smoke House. The spacious backyard is fenced and there is a large vegetable garden area.

The A.C. Davis house is listed on the National Historical Register. La Grange is centrally located (75 miles each way) between Raleigh and Morehead City; and also only 35 miles from Greenville and East Carolina University.

The Green-Parker-Tarwater House, known locally as “the Tarwater House,” was built in 1850 and is believed to be the product of renowned Greek Revival and Italianate builder Jacob Holt, who built numerous houses, churches, and even the town’s old jail, in Warrenton and other communities in northeastern North Carolina.

The home is approximately 3800 square feet. There are three bedrooms and four full bathrooms. Two of the bedrooms and bathrooms are on the third floor. The second (main) floor contains a large formal living room, dining room, den and full bathroom. The den or the formal living room could easily be converted into a main floor bedroom due to the full bathroom situated between them. Bulls-eye block molding, tall ceilings (10-12 ft on top two floors), original mantels, huge windows and heart pine floors are throughout the home. The house has four chimneys (all capped) and six fireplaces, two with gas logs (kitchen and den).

The first floor contains the kitchen, laundry room, large storage room, full bath and bedroom. The newly remodeled English kitchen is a true cook’s kitchen with five-burner gas range and marble counter tops. In addition to the countertops is a 3’X5’ island, the top of which is made of reclaimed pine from the old cotton mill that used to operate in town. The same wood is used for the open shelving in the kitchen. This compliments the exposed support beams that run along the ceiling.

The kitchen leads out to the patio, backyard, gardens and a three-car garage. This level has brick flooring which is great for easy maintenance, especially if one has pets. The backyard has two formal gardens, as well is a large lawn area, all completely fenced in. The upstairs of the three-car garage is very spacious and unfinished, allowing for tons of storage or possible bunk room/apartment.

A bonus structure, which used to be part of a late addition that was removed in the 1990s, overlooks the boxwood garden and has been converted to an office with built-in bookshelves.

This home is ideal for those with an appreciation for historic architecture, or who just want a spacious, comfortable house for gracious living and entertaining.
This is a great bargain for a unique piece of Southern American architectural history in beautiful, friendly and walkable downtown Warrenton. The home is under the protective covenants of Preservation North Carolina.

Warrenton is 1 hour from Raleigh and Durham and 2 hours south of Richmond.

The home will be featured on the Preservation Warrenton Christmas home tour this December 2nd and 3rd.

The one-and-one-half-story Yoder house, built in 1920-1921, is an excellent example of a Craftsman styled bungalow, with its broad gable roof, widely overhanging eaves, gabled front dormer with truss work ornament in the gable peak, and wraparound porch. Sheathing material varies from the replacement aluminum siding of the first story to the coursed wood shingles of the upper story. The porch boasts heavy granite posts and a low granite wall, quarried from Mt. Airy, NC. A shallow bay projects from the west elevation, and two interior chimneys pierce the roof ridge.

In 1986 the Yoder House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places as a contributing building with the Claremont High School Historic District.

Total rooms: 8 + enclosed heated rear porch
Bedrooms: 3
Bathrooms: 2

Interior is well maintained and intact, except for earlier removal of a pantry. Casements for the custom made glass front door and windows are stained wood. Pocket doors lead to a study room. Original mantles frame fireplaces for sealed chimneys. Attic storage is accessed through second floor closets. Basement storage is over 800 sq. ft.

Colin Monroe Yoder (1863-1953) was the son of Colonel G.M. Yoder, a commissioned officer in the Civil War, and Rebecca R. (Herman) Yoder. Before and after he moved his family to Hickory, Yoder owned a large farm in Catawba County, one mile south of Propst’s Crossroads. At his farm, between 1895 and 1905, Colin M. Yoder produced folk pottery, which he then sold in Mocksville, western Davie county, northern Iredell county, southern Wilkes county, and Alexander County. A charter member of the Grace Lutheran Church, he became a member of the Holy Trinity Lutheran Church when he moved to Hickory. Yoder attended Catawba College and then taught school for forty-three years, beginning at age seventeen. He married Emma Clementine Yoder (1885-1951), a distant relative. In 1912 he was elected Catawba County Commissioner. According to Colin’s youngest son, all of the lumber used to build the house was obtained from the farm and processed by the Hutton and Bourbonnais Company of Hickory. The granite was obtained in large slabs and cut by stonemasons on the site. Robert White was the chief carpenter. Yoder’s daughter, Annie L. Yoder, a registered nurse at the Richard Baker Hospital (now the Frye Regional Medical Center), lived in the house until it was sold to Floyd Thomas Barger, Sr. and his wife Dorothy Duggan Barger in 1968. Floyd Thomas Barger, Sr. was a supervisor in the sewing room at Hickory Chair. The house is currently owned by Floyd T. Barger, Michael Barger, Kathy Barger Fritz Smith and the estate of Tom Barger.

The Yoder House is located across Fifth Avenue from Frye Regional Medical Center and is the second of five National Register properties along the street. Neighborhood schools include Oakwood Elementary and Hickory High. Roof replaced ca. 2005-06. Lower bathroom handicap accessible. Natural gas heat. Plaster walls. Rear yard in fenced contains a gazebo and two-bay car port.

Preservation covenants apply.

This move-in ready Greek Revival home was built about 1855 and is located near the West Railroad Street Historic District. It was functionally renovated in 1983 with kitchen and bath updates being completed in 2016. The 3 bedroom, 2 bath home is sited on a large lot with its rear half being thickly wooded. The home has a large entrance hall, living room, dining room, den, kitchen and spacious pantry. The master bedroom has a large walk in closet. The floors in the entire house (except baths and kitchen) are original heart pine. There are 6 functioning fireplaces with 4 having original heart pine mantels. Many of the doors are original 4 paneled mortise-and-tenon heart pine. The front half of house has 12’9” ceilings, and the rear half has 9’ ceilings. A section of the back yard is fenced. There is also a nice storage building in the back yard.

Currently, exterior maintenance is minimal as vinyl siding and replacement windows were installed about 7 years ago. It has been owned for 35 years by the family who did the restoration in 1983.

La Grange is home to about 3,000 people and located approximately 1.5 hours from Raleigh/Durham and the Crystal Coast/Morehead City area. Greenville and East Carolina University are only about 45 minutes away, and Kinston is a mere 20 minutes with its hip restaurants, brewery, distilleries and other night life.

Ready for your cosmetic upgrades, the Historic Wall-Cardwell House, circa 1856, is a grand Greek-Revival two-story plantation house with massive columns made of curved brick and white masonry that sits on two acres. Heirloom boxwoods line the entry walkway. The interior is well-preserved with mantels and moldings that have been attributed to North Carolina antebellum Mastercraftsman Thomas Day. There are tall ceilings, large rooms and heart-pine flooring throughout most of the home. The house is being sold as-is with the kitchen and second bathroom needing updates. Cracked plaster and peeling wall paper will also need to be repaired. All of the windows have been replaced. The home has city sewer and water and there is a well for watering the garden and washing cars. A screened porch overlooks rolling pasture land where this is an additional 30 acres for sale. The three additional lots include one 5-acre parcel with a flowing spring and an old pond. There is also a 20-acre parcel that has an old tenant house that’s in disrepair.

http://www.searchallproperties.com/listings/2281075/7310-NC-135-High%20way-Mayodan-NC33

The Council-Coburn House is one of the most distinctive residences in Roanoke Rapids.  It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, eligible for tax credits, and is located in the local city school district.

Construction of this magnificent two-story saddle-notched log dwelling, began around 1925 and epitomizes the rustic-style that was a hallmark of twentieth-century eastern North Carolina.  This rustic revival, Neo-traditional style is currently popular and similar to the American Bungalow trend in current home developments.  The home is of H-plan, with a massive granite fieldstone chimney, flanked by transomed entrances and has several porches.  The main room occupies the entire first floor of the midsection, and is focused on one of the fieldstone chimneys at one end.  Dark brown stained logs accentuated by white-painted chinking and daubing are visible on the interior walls, and the ceilings are of exposed wood.

This five bedroom, three bath home has approximately 5160 square feet of living area. The rooms are very spacious with beautiful original hardwood floors, five stone fireplaces, and many original elements remain.  Some of the  original elements include but are not limited to, the cabinets and sink in the kitchen, light fixtures, wall sconces, hinges and hardware.  Walking into this beautiful home is truly like walking back in time!

Located in the heart of town, this home sits on approximately eight city lots (200’ x 140’), includes a detached two story garage (former servants quarters), and storage building (former stable).  A swimming pool was added in 1989.  The log construction is also repeated in these additional structures.

This property would make a wonderful and unique home, or great business opportunity.  With the proximity to two local lakes, the Roanoke River and great hunting in the area, the property would would be ideal for commercial use, including a bed and breakfast, lodge or special events center.

This is truly a rare opportunity, and is priced to sell at $189,000!

Additional photos and information regarding the property and the area are available by request.

MLS# 117289

For questions regarding tax credits and historical elements, please call 252-532-4078.

Graciously-updated 1880s mill house with original heart-pine flooring, exposed-beam ceilings, track lighting, and wide-plank walls and ceilings. This light-strewn home has lots of windows and an amazing gourmet cook’s kitchen. The master suite has built-in custom cabinetry, a sitting room, and a large walk-in closet. The second bedroom is being used as an artist’s studio and occupies what was once the kitchen building but is now cleverly incorporated into the home. The third bedroom could be used as a mother-in-law or guest suite and has new casement windows and a vaulted ceiling. 3 bedrooms, 3 full baths.

All historic homes in the Glencoe Mill Village are under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

For complete details, click here.

Live and/or work in this versatile historic house on a picturesque 0.55 acre lot. House and lot are surrounded by residential Mordecai & Oakwood historic districts, Mordecai Historic Park, William Peace University, an urban farm, Person Street & Seaboard Station shops & restaurants. Walk to nearby State government & downtown offices, courts, museums.

The Georgian Revival house was designed by James Salter, architect, and built for William Grimes and Nettie Dockery Haywood in 1920-1923. It is elegant – Doric columns, an open-pedimented entrance porch, fanlight windows, grand entrance foyer, 4 of 8 French doors open into fenced yard. It is practical – front & back stairs, 5 upstairs spaces (4 bedrooms), 3.5 baths, basement, walk-up attic, 2 bay garage, parking, loop driveway. It is solid – exterior walls are brick over clay tile blocks. Square feet do not include 249 square foot enclosed side porch.

The sellers now want to downsize after raising family here since 1998. Contact Peter for information about sellers’ improvements, needed finish work, Raleigh City Historic Preservation Agreement (covenants), mixed-use/conditional-use zoning and the exciting, vibrant neighborhood.

Slideshow: http://triangle.paragonrels.com/ParagonPublic/ListingSlideshow/Slideshow/TRIANGLE/d5deaf9d-480c-44c9-bcd8-1a960d438e75

More details: http://www.peterrumsey.com/Properties/Active/index.htm

Located in Wallace, the Barnett Carr House is a beautiful two-story Victorian house with many original details and loads of potential. Located in Duplin County, the heart of North Carolina’s wine industry, the potential may be available to purchase additional acreage separately in order to be used as a winery, lovely bed and breakfast, or event center!

Area Information

Wallace is a small town with a population of 3,880 but is Duplin County’s largest population and retail trade center, serving an estimated 50,000 people in a surrounding three county area. Located about 45 minutes to Wilmington and 1.5 hours to Raleigh, Wallace is home to a charming downtown, many prosperous industries and an active Chamber of Commerce. Numerous civic and fraternal organizations host events and cultural activities throughout the year, including The Longleaf Arts & Crafts Guild, The Wallace-Rose Hill Friends of the Arts, and the Wallace Revitalization Association. The restored Wallace Depot train station houses the Wallace Chamber of Commerce, a transportation museum, a model train exhibit, a permanent collection room and the Longleaf Arts & Crafts Guild gallery. The Town’s Parks and Recreational department arrange recreational programs, and the Campbell Center—a multi-purpose recreational facility—offers many activities for the community. The town and Wallace Revitalization Association also operate the Wanoca Outdoor Amphitheater. Wallace has a local airport and an 18-hole golf course in the area. For more information, visit www.wallacenc.gov.

Architectural & Historical Information

An earlier federal two room house was built on the site by Barnett Carr (1795-1880) and dates to the early 19th century. It was first expanded by Jacob Obed Carr (1840-1914) sometime in the mid 19th century, who added four rooms to the front of the first story, and two rooms above making it a two-story structure. In the late 19th century, Snyder Hiriam Carr made further additions to the house, adding two more rooms upstairs and the Victorian porches, being the configuration that exists today.

The two-story front porch retains its beautiful sawnwork details with turned spindle porch posts. Interior features include diagonal beadboard wainscoting in the central hall on both the first and second stories, original windows and doors, wood mantels in the parlors, original hardwood floors and original baseboards and door moldings. There are four large bedrooms upstairs, the potential for a master bedroom downstairs, and a large sun room that could make a beautiful light-filled kitchen.

The property has been vacant for many years and suffered significantly from neglect. The front porches will need to be structurally stabilized in order to avoid further collapse, and structural repairs are needed in the sun room. At minimum, the roof requires repairs. The property will need a complete rehabilitation including carpentry and cosmetic repairs, installation of all new systems (plumbing, electrical and HVAC), and updates to the existing bath and kitchen. Prospective buyers will likely wish to create a master bedroom with bath, and potentially move the location of the existing kitchen in order to accommodate a more modern and spacious kitchen.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Barnett Carr House

Located just blocks from the Downtown Clinton Commercial Historic District, 307 Giddens Street is an attractive four square house that is prime for adaptive reuse as residential, office or other commercial ventures.

Area Information

Clinton, the county seat of Sampson County, is the largest and oldest city in the county, having been incorporated in 1822. This quaint historic town with a population of 8,639 according to the 2010 US Census, boasts a growing number and variety of downtown shops, restaurants, and businesses, and is home to a robust and supportive business community with the City offering ample resources to business owners to build and maintain their business. Whether merely settling in for a night’s visit or settling down to make a home, you’ll feel the powerful bonds of community that have led Clinton to being named an “All-America City.” Take in a performance, view an art exhibit, learn about the local heritage, or attend a street festival. Downtown Clinton hosts events that have grown in attendance and quality each year. Conveniently located about 45 minutes from Fayetteville on Hwy 24.

Architectural & Historical Information

This spacious, two-story house built in 1920 features a full length porch and attached port cochere, with six original fireplaces, front door and transom, hardwood floors, large central hall on both stories, built-in china cabinet in the dining room, and some original two-over-two windows. The house has been covered with vinyl siding, but may retain some of the original siding beneath.  The house has seven spacious, bright and airy rooms, two bathrooms and a kitchen.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for 307 Giddens Street

On the magical, remote island of Ocracoke, a barrier island off the coast of North Carolina, sits one of the oldest properties on the island, the Ocracoke Island Inn. The Inn is located on a large corner lot in the heart of the quaint village at the intersection of the island’s two most traveled roads. Ocracoke boasts a thriving tourism economy. The Inn, now vacant and in a state of disrepair, once operated with 16 rooms and a full-service restaurant. Owner financing may be an option for qualified buyers. There is great potential for this property!

For more information, visit: ocracokeislandrealty.com.

Located in Winston Salem’s West End Historic District, the Grace Court Office Park is a unique opportunity to own a block of mixed use buildings in the heart of the city. The property includes 8 buildings: six single-tenant offices, one multi-tenant office, and a 5 unit apartment building. The hallmarks of this opportunity include its historic nature, vibrant location for business, and convenience to Winston-Salem’s most exciting restaurants, entertainment venues, and other great amenities

For a video tour of the property go to Property Videos Below or to our marketing web site:
http://gracecourt.baldwinco.com/

Own a Piece of History in the Louisburg Historical District! Sit on Your Front Porch and Enjoy Your Coffee & Neighbors! Colonial Style Home in Historic District! Lots of Great Character & History in this home! Original Hardwood Flooring on 2nd Floor! In-Law Suite with Bedroom, Separate Sitting Room & Bathroom on 1st Floor! 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bathrooms, Library/Study, Huge Dining Room, Butler’s Pantry, Covered Rear Porch, Office, Loft Area! Approximately 3600 Finished Square Feet!

The Walker-Fleming-Wilder-Taylor House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

The William C. Coker House is distinguished by its unique history and extraordinary setting. The house and its notable gardens testify to the complimentary functions of architecture and gardening and to the vision of a rare individual who helped to shape the prestigious University of North Carolina, the nation’s first state university, and its hometown of Chapel Hill.

The residence was constructed in 1908 for botany professor William Coker who had arrived in Chapel Hill and his post as associate professor of botany in 1903. Coker, a South Carolinian by birth, had already enjoyed a successful career in banking, completed a Ph.D with high distinction from Johns Hopkins University and studied in Germany at the laboratory of Eduard Strasburger, founder of modern plant cell biology. One of Coker’s first projects upon arriving in Chapel Hill was to begin the transformation of six boggy acres on what was then the eastern edge of the campus into a botanical garden. The Coker Arboretum, devoted largely to native plants
and trees, is still one of the campus’s most appealing settings. So it is fortunate that the home that Coker built and the gardens he designed for it came to be owned in 1986 by physician Woodrow Burns and his late wife Mary Jane Burns, both lovers of old houses and gardening. The
couple entered into a preservation agreement covering the 2.8 remaining acres of the property surrounding the house with the local preservation society, Preservation Chapel Hill, to protect the architectural, historical and botanical significance of the property.

They then set to work to restore the gardens as they thought William Coker would have done, a
demanding task as the gardens had deteriorated significantly in the years since Coker’s death. The Burnses sought advice from Chip Callaway of Callaway and Associates in Greensboro. Callaway, a specialist in historic gardens, has numerous famous garden restorations to his credit, including that of Ayr Mount, in Hillsborough, North Carolina, considered one of the most significant Federal period homes in the Piedmont.

Coker, who was noted for his prolific scholarly plant research, was truly a Renaissance man. In addition to botany, his interests included architecture, landscape architecture, campus planning, and residential ddevelopment. Coker’s choice of architectural style for his home indicates his depth of knowledge of current design trends, including the Arts and Crafts Movement prominent in the work of Frank Lloyd Wright. The Prairie Style of architecture, influenced by Wright, was selected by Coker for his home’s design. The structure’s deep over-hanging eaves, prowgabled
slate roof, grouped casement windows, interior stone chimney and exterior stucco finish speak to an integration with nature and a love of natural materials. The interior Arts and Crafts woodwork is among the most intact and extensive found in Chapel Hill. The Coker House could as easily be located in Asheville, with its preponderance of Craftsmen Style residences, many of which were designed by William Sharp Smith, the architect who completed the singularly magnificent Biltmore House.

The Coker House is well sited above North Street in the oldest Chapel Hill National Register Historic District. A winding drive flanked by towering white oaks and Eastern hemlocks leads to the house and continues to a departure drive off the rear elevation. A terrace with a low stone wall wraps around the home’s façade and welcomes the visitor. Double diamond-light French doors with flanking stuccoed pilasters shelter beneath a projecting one-story prow-gabled porch. The gabled entrance emphasizes the multiple gables of the two-story structure and its flanking
hipped roof porches, some enclosed, some open. The doors open to a sweeping transverse entry hall, floored in quartersawn oak, and a view of the richly turned balustrade that characterizes
the home’s two-story staircase that carries to a wide stair landing on the second level. To the right is the main parlor with a massive stone fireplace that rises to a ceiling that features white oak boxed beams. The room is lit by groups of diamond-paned casement windows, a design feature that appears throughout the house. All floors in the house are of quality hardwoods, including quarter-sawn oak and heart-pine. To the left, a snug library features another fireplace with a tall paneled Arts and Crafts surround. There is a powder room off the library. Two French doors open to the north porch that was enclosed after William Coker’s death. A onelight French door with sidelights and a three-part transom opens to the terrace in the home’s front elevation. Picture windows line the porch and offer a view of the garden’s arbor walk, cutting border and rose beds.

There are additional porches on the home’s southern elevation. French doors lead from the parlor to an open air sitting area. The parlor also gives access to a small interior sun porch. The dining room opening from the parlor equals the parlor’s dramatic design, with beamed ceilings and the grouped diamond-paned casement windows. There is a large inset archtopped china cabinet that fits into the handsomely paneled Arts and Crafts woodwork that decorates the room’s walls. A butler’s pantry/bar with original bracketed shelving leads to the modernized kitchen. Designed by Mary Jane Burns and restoration contractor Todd Dickinson, the kitchen has stood the test of time. One exterior wall was expanded to give space and light to the room that opens to the semi-circular outdoor slate terrace. The terrace, which is connected by descending stone steps to parking court on the northern elevation, was laid by Chip Callaway’s team with antique salvaged slate. The kitchen appliances are stainless, as is the work/seating island, and there is extensive cabinetry for dinnerware and cookware. A back staircase leads to the bedrooms above.

The second level of the Coker House is accessed by the main staircase that leads to the landing with a built-in window seat beneath casement windows overlooking the front lawn and driveway. The master bedroom features a fireplace, large closets and a period bathroom with original porcelain tiles and deep bathing tub. A bedroom/nursery adjoins the master and shares the master bath but also has hall access. The second level has two additional bedrooms, bringing the total number in the home to four, with three and one-half baths. The bedroom at the north end of the front elevation has its own fireplace and ensuite bath. It also features a charming balcony, providing an expansive view of the garden house, roses and cutting border. The home’s utility basement is equipped as a laundry.

The Burnses restored the Coker Estate and gardens with the cooperation of the North Carolina Botanical Garden, which maintains a small public park on the grounds. The Burnses placed an easement in honor of Coker’s wife, Louise Manning Venable Coker, to allow viewing of the large stone outcroppings that border North Street. These picturesque boulders gave rise to the property’s local name, “The Rocks.”

Come home to this totally renovated Mill home in the Historic Glencoe Mill Village. Hardwood floors, custom built-ins, incredible screened porch, modern kitchen and baths with the proper touch of period charm. This home has so much to offer! Much of the work done to the home is reclaimed wood used from local sources. Large basement space great for storage or possible additional living.

All historic homes in the Glencoe Mill Village are under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Built in 1887 on 3200 acres in Greensboro, NC, Reedy Fork Ranch is a magnificent example of Queen Anne Victorian architecture. The current owners brought it to Chapel Hill in 2003 and meticulously restored it. All plaster was removed and replaced, allowing for AC vents to be installed. All levels of the house and the separate garage have radiant heated floors. The double-deep garage will house 3+ cars, has a full bath, workshop area, finished upper level. The house has a wide wrap porch, 7 bedrooms, 10 restored and working fireplaces, a widow’s watch on the third floor. Elaborate oak paneling graces the entry and dining hall. Master bedroom has private bath and large dressing room. Lower level has media room, walkout family room, office space. Large bedrooms, high ceilings, two living rooms, very large eat-in kitchen with high end appliances. Lush landscaping provides privacy. Chapel Hill schools.

For a video tour of Reedy Fork Ranch, please click here.

The historic Reedy Fork House (also known as Great Oaks) is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x 221 to request a copy of these covenants.

This wonderfully restored Historic Home sits on the Perquimans River with a great pier and easy access to the Albemarle Sound. With beautiful sunsets from the 1802 John Bogue Home–the current residents enjoy the best of waterfront property, but also the best of early American History. All of the restoration work is already complete. Nice outbuildings on the property provide the opportunity for inside activities outside of the historic home as well. The home’s long and magnificent history is available for prospective buyers. And the property is easy to view. Call for an appointment today!

For more photos or information, please visit: www.davidemccall.com.

The historic John Bogue House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

 

FOR SALE: Vanhook-Worsham-Stamps House

A truly unique two-story cottage, the 1852 Vanhook-Worsham-Stamps house echoes the second phase of the development of Greek Revival architecture in North America. It is an excellent example of the movement to take the look and feel of grand Greek Revival plantation homes found throughout the American South and create smaller homes that reflected their small-town surroundings in Caswell County, NC.

Vanhook-Worsham-Stamps house is a two pin log home that features a number of Greek Revival characteristics, including street-facing façade and gable, a hip roof with widely overhanging eaves and clapboard siding, while the upper casement windows give rise to a shallow second story. The windows reflect mid-19th century glazing styles, which are double hung with six panes to a sash, while two exterior chimneys are placed according to the needs of the home. The east chimney has a number of inscriptions, including the date of construction and multiple initials. The double front doorway makes a statement that is also consistent with the architectural style and the stone wing on the back remains from the original 1780 structure. Woodwork throughout the home, including but not limited to floors, molding, wainscoting and the staircase, is completely intact and dates to 1852.

The double front doorway open to an unusually wide hall. The Drawing Room (14′ 10 1/2″ X 19′ 3 3/8″) with fireplace to the left and the Dining Room (14′ 11 3/8″ X 19′ 3 3/8″) with a second fireplace and door to the outside. The Kitchen (19′ 4″ X 15′ 4 1/8″), constructed of stone and dated to 1780, is located adjacent to the Dining Room and is accessed via an additional hallway that provides an excellent location for a future half bath/powder room. The second floor features two bedrooms and a wide hall.

The Vanhook-Worsham-Stamps house has been completely dismantled, cataloged and stored by a renowned builder in Caswell County, NC.

Please contact Kate Shields at 703-615-0431 or thehasteningfarm@gmail.com with any questions or to discuss purchase.

Walking into this 120 yr old Victorian home is like walking back in time. It has had the distinct honor to have been featured in Southern Living, Victorian Homes and the Preservation of NC. In 1998 the previous owners had it restored to its former Glory.This 4,077 beauty has a Large wrap around Porch, Formal Parlor, 2 Grand Foyers, Living Room, Office, Formal Dining Rm, 3 brand New HVAC systems 2016,New insulation and the list goes on.

The historic Angus Curry House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Built during the agricultural boom years of the 1830s, Grape Hill is an unusual blend of sophisticated interior woodwork emblematic of Antebellum Warren County architecture within an exterior of elegant simplicity.

Area Information

The quaint town of Norlina (Norlina is the mailing address and therefore the closest town to Grape Hill, which is actually in the vicinity of the Wise community) in Warren County can trace its roots back to the early 19th century, when it was a stopover for supplies along the Raleigh & Gaston and Seaboard & Roanoke Railroads. With convenient access to 85, this small community is only about 10 miles from the Virginia State Line, and is close to both Lake Gaston and Kerr Lake.  Norlina is about an hour from Durham and Research Triangle Park.

Architectural & Historical Information

Built for the Joshua Davis Jr. family near Locust Grove, the seat of his parents’ plantation, it appears to be a simple two-story Federal-Adamesque I-house, but on a much grander scale. Archival photographs show its original entry porch was more Greek Revival in style with a pedimented portico supported by a Doric entablature.

The tall five-bay façade with side addition accommodates two stories of nine-over-nine windows, a molded box cornice, tall stone chimneys stuccoed and scored to give a refined ashlar finish, all resting on a high stone foundation under which is located a basement with summer kitchen and workspace.

The double-leaf entry doors lead into a wide highly ornamented hallway with tall marbleized baseboards, heavily molded door surrounds with bullseye cornerblocks and a low wainscot. The stairway is located at the back of the wide center hall and features a single-run stair with ogee bracket ends and marbelized risers. The enormous main parlor shares similar woodwork to the center hall including marbleized baseboards, low wainscot with a heavy band creating a chair rail.

The highlight of the main parlor is a mantel which shares intricate detail with some of the finest early houses in Warren County showcasing wide molded engaged pilasters supporting a multi-paneled frieze topped by a delicately carved lozenge band below the deep molded shelf. Both parlor mantels were stolen years ago, but happily the mantel from the main parlor was recovered and has been safely stored off site. The remaining first floor rooms share more simplified versions of the parlor and center hall woodwork such as a low wainscot, six-panel doors and a post-and-lintel mantel with molded detailing in the side addition. Plaster walls and beautiful wide board wood floors can be found throughout the house. The former gabled rear porch located at the back of the center hall was enclosed decades ago and includes a bathroom.

Second floor details are fine yet predictably more modest and include simple paneled mantels, six-panel doors, chair rails, and simplified version of the first floor stair that continues up to two large attic rooms. The second story is also divided by a stair hall with one large bedroom on one side and three rooms on the other side of the hall. Much original paint remains on doors and trim (red and blue-gray).

Grape Hill has been vacant for many years and has been used for storage for the surrounding farm. The house must be moved or it will be lost to demolition. The house appears to be very sturdy, but will require a complete rehabilitation once moved to its new site.

Click here for an article on Grape Hill’s history.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for Grape Hill

Great restoration project in historic Warrenton! Wiring has been pulled. Inside needs to be finished. Included is a detached apartment and a mobile home. These produce approximately $900.00 of monthly income. Live in one while completing renovations. Historic district.

www.BarrettRealtyWakeForest.com

Built in 1892 in Weldon by the Roanoke Navigation Company as a corn mill, this beautiful restored property situated on five acres at the falls on the Roanoke River is steeped in history. It is located at the terminus of the Roanoke Navigation Canal and is on the National Register as a part of that seven mile historic walking trail that follows the course of the river upstream to Roanoke Rapids Lake.

The building and grounds were the site of the first “Rockfish” (striped bass) hatchery in the United States as well as the site of the first commercial electric power plant in North Carolina. Within a one mile radius of the building are significant canal structures, civil war fortifications, historic railroad structures and the best striped bass fishing on the east coast during April and May.

The property is over five acres with 500 feet of waterfront on the Roanoke River and includes an additional small power plant (@1800 sq. ft.) that could be restored also. When we restored the main building we preserved the flexibility to utilize the property for either residential or commercial uses. There are three floors and a basement in the main portion of the building with an additional two story annex attached.

The new slate roof was installed in 2008. All of the windows have been replaced and a two new 2-ton heat pumps have been installed on the first floor. The first floor and basement have been fully restored using reclaimed on site materials or like kind material from other salvage properties. There is a half bath on the first floor and two half baths in the basement. The basement also has a commissary kitchen with a three bay sink and a refrigerator. The floors on the first level and in the basement are pine; the second floor annex is pine and the second main floor is oak. The third floor was completely replaced and has six inch pine floors. The main trusses are visible on the third floor with a total elevation from the floor to the peak of 24 feet. The building is currently wired with a 200 amp service but has the capacity to be 400 amp. The front balcony and railing are new to the building and replicate the renovations done by the WPA in the 1930’s. The flat area to the left of the building was a swimming pool that was filled and could utilized again if desired.

Uses that have been suggested for the property have included residential housing, winery, craft brewery, bed and breakfast, boutique hotel, hunting and fishing lodge, corporate retreat, event facility, and a travel center with campground.

https://www.facebook.com/The-Roanoke-River-Mill-331306378977/reviews/

Feel free to call 252-676-4309 if interested in more historical information or additional opportunities related to the property.

Possible owner financing dependent on situation.

Warrenton, NC, 6,500 sq ft plus full basement!! 5BR, 4B , Built 1922. Over $150,000 in improvements in last 2 years! Total new kitchen, new heat (forced air, 4 zones), steam heat also, new boiler, 2 remodeled baths, Plaster crown in Formal Living, music room, dining, foyer, 8 french doors, plantation shutters, Completely fenced, new electric gate, new paint within last 2 years, farmers sink in kitchen, tons of closet space, cedar storage in attic, maids rm with separate entrance, Full basement with concrete floor. Historic Dist, 2 acre lot, fenced, Home in great condition.  Click here to see more information about the property, including a video.

The 1 1/2-story Haywood-Taft House is located in the picturesque Town of Mt. Gilead on a large green lot on Main Street just south of the downtown historic district. This home has an inviting pattern book-inspired front porch draped with carved and sawnwork ornament, a spacious, Georgian-plan interior with mantels in nearly every room, and many other original features. An unusual slate chimney on the rear kitchen wing wall exemplifies the wealth of materials enriching the buildings in this charming Uwharrie Mountain town.

Area Information

Mt. Gilead is a lovely small town of around 1,400 residents situated in the beautiful Uwharrie Mountains and located between Charlotte and Fayetteville and just south of Greensboro. The downtown is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and has an attractive collection of Victorian and early 20th century buildings. It is home to charming antique shops, locally-owned businesses including an old-time hardware store and McRae Industries (makers of military and western boots), the Piedmont Arts Guild, and the Mount Gilead Museum. Mt. Gilead is also home to several surrounding recreational areas including Lake Tillery, the Pee Dee River, Badin Lake Recreational Area, Morrow Mountain State Park and numerous hiking trails, making it the perfect location for outdoor enthusiasts. Also nearby is the Town Creek Indian Mound State Historical Site, that interprets pre-Columbian culture on the Little River. Click here for an excellent article by Our State Magazine about Mount Gilead.

Architectural &  Historical Information

Situated in the Uwharrie Mountains, Mt. Gilead benefited from its location on the Fayetteville to Salisbury Plank Road, early successful gold mines, its position as a cotton trading center, and the Norfolk Southern railroad. The architecture of the Haywood-Taft House reflects that thriving economic history with its Greek Revival/Antebellum form and Victorian embellishments.

Most likely built by local builder/architect/engineer Will Haywood, the house is a story-and-a-half, frame house with an inviting pattern book-inspired front porch draped with carved and sawnwork ornament divided by chamfered posts and anchored with turned balustrades. The multi-gabled roof is equally as showy with a deep cornice and wide eaves embellished with elaborate pendant brackets and scroll ornament. Windows consist of six-over-six sash and louvered shutters. The central entrance contains a glazed upper-panel door framed by paneled sidelights and a wide transom. A rear kitchen wing attached to the northwest end of the house features a unique, exterior slate chimney composed of large slabs of smooth gray rock. A side porch off the south elevation of the kitchen overlooks a brick-lined well sheltered beneath a hip roof.

The broad gable-end roof and front wall dormer provide generous space for two second-floor rooms separated by a large stair hall. Likewise, the spacious interior rooms on the first floor consist of four rooms separated by a wide stair hall and a fifth room on the north (right side) offering space for an interior kitchen. The first floor stair hall is made up of a curved wall supporting the stairs, a balustrade with delicately turned banisters and molded railing terminating in a robust turned newel post. The high ceiling and generous room dimensions offer a spacious interior. Plaster walls throughout the first floor are in good to fair condition for the most part. Ceilings are wood sheathed, as are the walls in the second floor rooms. Additional woodwork includes simple yet attractive mantels, high baseboards, and two- and four-panel doors.

The Haywood-Taft House requires a comprehensive rehabilitation including all new systems (HVAC, plumbing, and electrical), significant carpentry repairs, and updates to the kitchen and baths.

Click here to view the PDF brochure for the Haywood-Taft House

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom home has been beautifully rehabbed on the outside and is waiting for you to put the finishing touches on the inside. It is ideal for first-time home buyers or those looking to downsize, and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes from Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill is just blocks away and features both residential and commercial opportunities and future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all in this beautifully rehabbed historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming home has been fully rehabilitated on the exterior, and is a blank canvas on the inside, ideal for buyers who would like to customize the interior to suit their tastes and style. The proposed plans are for a one bedroom, one bath home with a large loft space.

212 S. Weldon Street, built around 1902 and relocated from S. Vance Street, is a Type A mill house that was altered over the years but has been restored to its original configuration. The many restored windows make the space light, bright and airy, and a front porch and a deck (planned) off the kitchen will provide ample opportunity for relaxing outdoors.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for 212 S. Weldon Street

Rare opportunity to own a part of history – this gorgeous Greek Revival mansion is waiting for you! Often referred to as “The Jewel of Franklin County”, the home boasts a dramatic entry foyer with breathtaking staircase. Stunning hardwoods and tall ceilings are found throughout most of the home. The grand kitchen and keeping room feature a vaulted ceiling, working fireplace and limestone flooring. The cook in the house will love the double wall ovens, separate gas cook top and oversized island with 2nd sink. Beautiful fireplaces adorn every room. All bedrooms are generously sized and the first floor master bedroom features a large en suite bathroom with dual vanities, oversized shower and separate whirlpool tub.
Relax on multiple covered porches overlooking the large, private yard. The possibilities are endless with this one of a kind home!

For a virtual tour of the home, visit: http://fusion.realtourvision.com/329319.

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming home with an inviting front porch is waiting for you to add your finishing touch. It is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by rehabbing this historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

This 1920 Type C mill house has been relocated from across the street, with some rehabilitation work completed, and more work being finished each day. With a lot of the major rehabilitation work completed, this two bedroom, two bath house is an easy rehabilitation project that can be completely customized to suit the needs and preferences of the buyer. The property also has a large shed with plenty of space for storage, or could be used as a home office or workshop. Situated on one of the larger lots in the mill village that backs up to trees, it has ample space to enjoy relaxing outdoors.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for 329 S. Vance Street

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village!  This charming 1 bedroom home is a blank slate waiting for you to make the finishing touches and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by finishing the rehab on this historic home!

Architectural and Historical Information

This 1901 Type A mill house has been relocated from across the street, and has had some rehabilitation work completed, with more work being finished each day. With a lot of the major rehabilitation work completed, this one bedroom, one bath house is an easy rehabilitation project that can be completely customized to suit the needs and preferences of the buyer. Situated on one of the larger lots in the mill village that backs up to trees, it has ample space to enjoy relaxing outdoors.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for 325 S. Vance Street

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming home still has many original features and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by rehabbing this historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

This 1901 Type A mill house has been relocated next door to its original lot and has a completely new foundation.  It is waiting for a buyer to come make it their own!

336 S. Vance Street is a contributing structure in the Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District and is therefore eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits. This historic property needs a complete rehabilitation, including updates to systems (HVAC, plumbing and wiring) as well as cosmetic updates. In keeping with our goals to revitalize the Loray Mill Village to become a vibrant, diverse and desirable place to live, property restrictions will include a requirement for owner occupancy.

Click here to see the pdf brochure for 336 S. Vance Street

Restoration of the Historic Brown-Watkins House at 217 College Street Oxford, NC:
A crowning jewel of Historic College Street on the National Historic Registry.

The object of this restoration is to restore this grand Colonial Revival Home back to its 1901 appearance when originally built, but with the functionality and amenities of today’s fine homes.

The home is being restored with guidelines set by Preservation North Carolina.

The house is being completely rewired and plumbed, with all new HVAC installed.

Heart pine flooring throughout is being replaced in some areas and all floors restored and refinished.

Reconfiguring spaces will allow for master baths with soaking tubs and showers and walk-in closets on first and second floor.

The existing round room at the rear of the house is being restored as a flagstone covered patio.

Space changes on the second floor will consist of master bedroom and bath and 2 additional bedrooms with private baths.

New kitchen to have custom cabinetry, granite countertops, top of the line Delta plumbing fixtures, and top of the line stainless appliances.

New bathrooms will have custom cabinetry, granite countertops and top of the line Delta plumbing fixtures.

A ½ bath on the first floor will have a vintage lavatory.

Completed layout will consist of living room ,dining room kitchen with morning Room and Dining nook, 4 bedrooms 4 and ½ baths and covered flagstone patio, with a total of approximately 3700 square feet heated living space.

An added feature of the home is a double detached garage built in the 1970’s with an apartment over the garage including a kitchen and bath.
This space needs only clean up and paint.
The property also includes a “garden house.”
Plans are to landscape the 400 – foot deep lot as it was originally, based on plans found in photographs in the house.

Click here to learn more about the Brown-Watkins House.

This fine, 2-story Queen Anne house retains many original interior features, has a solid assessment of the house, plus a view of the Brushy Mountains! The Winkler House is poised to be an integral part of the revitalization of downtown Wilkesboro. While the house has seen many modifications over the years, the essential integrity and character of its interior features remain, including a fabulous front door, fine staircase and several detailed fireplace mantels.

Area Information

The charming mountain town of Wilkesboro is known worldwide for MerleFest, a diverse roots-music festival dedicated to the memory of Merle Watson, son of the late legendary folk guitarist/singer Doc Watson. Both the town and Wilkes County are home to award-wining vineyards and distilleries, plus over 45 miles of mountain biking trails! Historic Downtown Wilkesboro is at the heart of it all with its Downtown Revitalization Project transforming the streetscape and public gathering spaces, and the Winkler House has a bird’s eye view. There is even a grant program available. Phase I gives visitors a new Open Air Market space with a concert stage and lawn, plus a kid-friendly splash pad in the Wilkes Heritage Museum courtyard. The revitalization project includes three future phases that will address Main Street and adjacent side streets, including South Bridge Street to Cub Creek Park. Additional area attractions include the Wilkesboro Open Air Market, Carolina in the Fall Music & Food Festival, and the Brushy Mountain Apple Festival. Wilkesboro is about an hour west of Winston-Salem, about an hour from Lake Norman, and 30 miles to Boone. Nearby outdoor activities abound, including hiking along the Blue Ridge and in Stone Mountain State Park, kayaking, fishing, and disc golf. Discover more about Wilkesboro at www.wilkescountytourism.com.

Archictectural & Historical Information

The original house was built in 1892 and has been altered several times over the course of its history, but much of the character-defining architecture remains today. The house was built in a restrained Queen Anne style featuring steep gabled roofs, drop-lap (German) siding, large bay windows, elaborately detailed front and side doors, and a wide L-shaped front porch. The front portion of the house was built on dry stacked-stone piers, and the middle and rear sections were built on brick foundation walls which enclose the basement level.

It is thought to be the first house in Wilkes County to feature indoor plumbing, and the original brick spring-fed cistern with plaster lining can still be seen in the basement today. The location of the original well is currently marked by a square concrete pad, but it once would have been covered by an independent well-house structure. Today the well is enclosed under later house additions, but it originally stood behind the house where the brick cistern was covered by a rear porch, protecting the clean drinking water from the intrusion of rainwater.

One of the most unique features of the original house is the presence of a basement kitchen. The original brick foundation walls were plastered, indicating that the space was used for food preparation and storage. The original basement fireplace (also plastered) would have been used for cooking, and it remains today below the center hall of the house. The chimney was removed during early renovations, but it once ran along the wall which separates the northern rooms from the stairs, and out through the prominent front gable. Today, patches in the original wood floors indicate the location of the chimney penetrations.

The house was built in 1892 by William Carter Winkler (1858 – 1939) and his wife Mary Louisa Bower (1866 – 1928), and is situated on a hill one block from the Wilkes County Courthouse (built 1902). The location of the house is an indication of the prominence of the Winkler family as well as the significance of the house in the landscape of downtown Wilkesboro.

Owner financing may be available.

Taken from the feasibility study prepared by Maurer Architecture, a copy of which (including detailed information about rehab needs) will be made available upon request to prospective buyers.

Click here to view a 3-D virtual tour of the property

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the W. Carter Winkler House

 

This important early house with Guilford College ties must be moved – again! It has simple yet refined woodwork, mortise-and-tenon construction, and a modified Quaker plan ready for permanent new location.

Area Information

High Point is located in the Piedmont Triad region and is North Carolina’s 9th largest city. It is known for its furniture, textiles, and bus manufacturing. The city is sometimes referred to as the “Furniture Capital of the World, “and a semi-annual furniture market is held which attracts 100,000 exhibitors and buyers from around the world. High Point is home to three universities: High Point University, South University and Laurel University.  Most of the city is located in Guilford County, with portions spilling into neighboring Randolph, Davidson, and Forsyth counties.  High Point is less than 20 minutes from Greensboro and less than 30 minutes from Winston-Salem and the Piedmont Triad International Airport.

Architectural & Historical Information

Built c. 1830, the Nereus Mendenhall House, also known as The Oaks, is a highly significant I-house with a modified Quaker-plan interior with a center hall. Features include wide overhanging eaves, a full facade shed porch with flush wood sheathing beneath and in the gables and slightly tapered porch columns. Throughout the interior are horizontal wood sheathing, simple yet unique mantel with raised panel frieze, two-panel doors, and a staircase in the center hall featuring an elegant stair rail with square balustrade and unusual turned newel posts. Two rear shed rooms and an attached kitchen dependency did not survive the first move. The main part of the house is of heavy mortise and tenon construction, making it an ideal candidate for a move. Some salvaged material is stored on site including planks, doors, original foundation stone and brick.

“The Oaks” was named for a stand of ancient oak trees that stood in the front yard of the house built for Orianna Wilson and Dr. Nereus Mendenhall. Nereus was born in the Richard Mendenhall Plantation house in Jamestown and attended Haverford College and Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. Upon his return to Guilford County, he practiced medicine for six years before taking a position as a surveyor for the North Carolina Railroad. An advocate for public education, Nereus increasingly grew interested in teaching and eventually took on administrative and teaching roles at nearby schools, including New Garden Friends School near Greensboro, which eventually became Guilford College. He served as principal there at various times between 1839 and 1866 and is credited with keeping it open during the Civil War. He served as clerk of North Carolina Yearly Meeting from 1860 to 1871 and was elected to the state legislature for the 1874–1875 term, during which time he worked as a member of the building committee to establish a state hospital for the insane in Morganton.

“The Oaks” was relocated under threat of demolition in 1998 to a site off Penny Road near High Point. It must now find a permanent new location.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Nereus Mendenhall House

Early Federal/Greek Revival house in Pittsboro must be moved! Its stately form and sturdy construction make it an excellent candidate for a move to a new site in this beautiful and growing area. Located just west of Apex and the Triangle and south of Chapel Hill, Pittsboro and Chatham County provide both rural charm and sophistication. Help us save this early piece of Pittsboro’s history and give it a lovely new setting on your own land!

Funds are available to offset the cost of moving the structure up to $20,000, payable directly to the buyer’s house moving contractor.

Architectural and Historical Information

Built of sturdy mortise and tenon construction, this early Federal/Greek Revival house is an unusual combination of the tall narrow Quaker plan houses popular in Pittsboro in the 1830s and 1840s and Georgian plan I-houses with shed rooms along the rear elevation. While somewhat altered, the house retains the tall two-story form, brick end chimneys, and several features reminiscent of the fine early 19th century houses built in and around Pittsboro. Underneath the artificial siding is intact clapboards with boxed cornice. Within the now-enclosed porch remains flush wood sheathing. The interior features an intact hall and parlor plan, panelled wainscot with chair rail in the main parlor, wood wall sheathing and board and batten door in the chamber, enclosed winder stair with hand planed wood sheathing, a couple of very nice 2-panel doors, cornerblock detailing in door surrounds, and heartpine flooring. The house underwent some changes in the 1920s (a couple of Craftsman brick mantels testify to that) and was moved slightly in the 1950s and placed on a sturdy brick foundation over a basement. The house is in good condition and is an excellent candidate for moving.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Griffin-White House

LANDMARK ROCKY MOUNT BUILDING OFFERED
The historic May & Gorham Building constructed in 1904 is offered for sale for rehabilitation and preservation. The building contains approximately 11,800 square feet and includes an early 20th Century pharmacy with original fixtures, flooring and pressed-tin ceiling intact. The rear portion of the 1st floor and 2nd floor of the building were rehabilitated for office use about 1990. The building currently requires further rehabilitation and system upgrades. The price is $150,000.00 and the Seller requires a rehabilitation agreement with negotiated timelines and scope of work. The building is a contributing building in a National Register and local downtown historic district, and tax credits may be available. For details contact John Jesso at (252) 972-1267.

 

 

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom home has been beautifully rehabilitated with top-of-the-line interior finishes. It is ideal for first-time home buyers or those looking to downsize, and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes from Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill is just blocks away and features both residential and commercial opportunities and future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all in this beautifully rehabbed historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

906 W. 2nd Avenue, built around 1902, was altered over the years but has been fully restored and rehabilitated with great attention to detail. Modern amenities include classic tile floors in the bathroom, a contemporary kitchen with high-end appliances, hard surface countertops, built-ins and more!  Original siding, mantel, flooring and restored windows remain. High ceilings make the space light, bright and airy, and both a deck and front porch provide ample opportunity for relaxing outdoors.

Click here to see more photos and information about the property.

Click here to see the pdf brochure for 906 W. Second Avenue

 

 

ADOPT THIS HOUSE! The New Bern Preservation Foundation is offering the historic Mill Manager’s House at 907 N. Craven Street for FREE to SAVE the building from being demolished! IT MUST BE MOVED!

The circa 1900 frame house has 7 rooms and approximately 2,850 sq. ft.
The house has a side hall plan with an intact stair case. It is offered for free for rehabilitation to someone who will relocate the building at his/her expense.

Truly rare opportunity to own a unique super-cool property.  Roaring 20’s arm-in-arm with New Media 90’s.  A custom-built 1997 Luxury Home married to an amazing 1920 tailored Granary.  The 3-floor robust Granary larger than the younger elegant Home.  Careful consideration was given to design aspects and placement of the home relative to the historic Granary.  Now you can stroll between decades via a windowed vestibule.  This fine complimentary pair is perfectly situated on 3.27 prime acres in prestigious Wakefield Estates.  Very convenient to the shores of beautiful Falls Lake, McConnell Tournament Players Club at Wakefield Plantation Clubhouse, Wakefield Barn riding stable, great schools and shopping.

The Granary is one of two structures remaining from Wakefield Farms.  Wakefield Farms was a massive farm/dairy operation with buildings dating from the mid 19th to early 20th century.  Farm operations started winding down during the 1950’s.

Massive Wakefield Barn is the other historic structure remaining Wakefield Farms.  Presently used as an equestrian center, it’s also a Wake County Historic Landmark and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Home and Granary

The home boasts thoughtful design aspects and wonderful upgrades.  Over 5,100 square feet with 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, thoughtfully laid out to exhibit a variety of ceiling treatments, open stairway, private sitting areas, large deck and screened porch.

Main floor hosts the master suite with double closets and an oversized Kohler soaking tub.  Gourmet kitchen is outfitted with Canac cabinetry, Sub-Zero Pro 48 Refrigeration, Miele Dishwasher and Aga Cooker.

Both formal and informal living rooms contain fireplaces.  A separate breakfast room, formal dining room and laundry complete the main floor.  A 3-car garage is accessed from the kitchen.

Top floor has a large second master suite with adjoining office (or nursery) and two guest rooms sharing a Jack & Jill bath.  A landing/sitting area overlooks both the formal and informal rooms below.

Bottom level of the home is designed for family living/in-law suite.  It’s accessed via an oak staircase from the main level or via it’s own grade level exterior entrance.  This level of the home contains living room with fireplace, a family room with kitchenette, bedroom, full bath and second laundry room.  All door openings are 3 feet wide.  Enjoy separately controlled heating and air conditioning.  From here there is access to approximately 1500 square feet of unfinished basement with concrete floor and poured in-place concrete walls.

The Granary is heavy timber construction courtesy of trees at the farm.  It still houses some interesting original equipment and is connected to the home via an enclosed slate floor breezeway.

The multi-floor Granary is unconditioned and currently sports a 3-season “man cave” in the section closest to the home.  Uses of the Granary are limited by imagination.  Suggestions have included – storage for automobile collections, artist studio, home business office, wood working…etc..  It can certainly accommodate more than one idea. The Granary is 6,179 square feet.

Slideshow: http://surfraleigh.com/homes/2005-rolling-rock

3D and Aerial Tours: http://www.aeriallook.com/2005rollingrockroad

Article about the Granary: Wakefield Granary – Grist and Glamour

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STUNNING RENOVATED VICTORIAN c 1915 with 1300 sq. ft. wrap-around porch with Haint Blue painted ceiling. Situated on 3 acres, the home features Tuscan columns and a pyramidal roof with ornamental gables.

The Baker-Rogerson home was moved across the road to its current location in 1997 and placed on a new brick foundation. The interior was reframed and drywalled, and the electric, plumbing and HVAC were replaced and modernized, giving this home an effective age of 20 yrs.

Many of the unique features were retained such as the entry doors, stained glass windows, interior locks, & hard pine floors with parquet inlay original to the house. In 2006 a 2-story 3-bay carriage style garage was built. 3 beautiful acres. 3200 square feet. 4 BR 3 BA. 1st floor: Foyer. Living Room. Den. Mud Room. Full Bath. Kitchen. 2nd floor: 4 BR 2 BA. Upper covered porch.

Here is a rare opportunity to buy a grand turn-of-the-century Victorian with an effective age of 20 years. Featured in The Historic Architecture in Perquimans County, North Carolina, by Dru Haley and Raymond A. Winslow, Jr. Call for more information and a private viewing. To see a virtual tour, click here: https://youtu.be/Eg1r14matPE.

Perfectly situated on a stunning one acre lot in the historic district and walkable to vibrant downtown Clinton, NC. Enjoy living in rare elegance provided by this extraordinary home. Entertain, pamper and visit with family and friends on large graceful porches – upstairs and down.

Behind the home, and included in the sale, are 3 other structures – the interesting original smoke-house and two guest houses.

Some updating is needed but the numerous original architectural details are astounding – including paneled wainscot, intricate staircase, Greek Revival door and window surrounds. Five of the six fireplace mantles are Greek Revival and one front parlor mantle is marble.

An original back porch was long ago incorporated into the house to accommodate a kitchen. And the original kitchen off the back porch was converted into a garage. There are good options for incorporating a modern kitchen. Among them, reclaiming the original kitchen space.

Contact Paul to learn more about this wonderful historic home.

Links with more about this home:
Slideshow http://surfraleigh.com/historic/allmand-holmes-house
3D and Aerial http://www.aeriallook.com/311wmainstreet
Podcast http://surfraleigh.com/allmand-holmes-house-srp001
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SnapChat @paulsetliff

The J. Beale Johnson House, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, is an elegant neoclassical-style house built in 1906. The home was last purchased and fully renovated in 1968 and has been lovingly maintained by the Turner family; hence, it is more recently known as the Johnson-Turner House. Situated on 5 acres, this imposing residence has 5 bedrooms, 3 full baths with a first floor master bedroom and full bath. There are 5 fireplaces, hardwood floors throughout, grand central hallways on the first and second floors, 11′ ceilings, pocket doors, and many fine architectural details. Located in Fuquay-Varina, a thriving town in southern Wake County, this home is a 25 minute commute to Cary or Downtown Raleigh.

For more information, visit: www.TomHawkinsSellsHomes.com.

This home is located on Pearl Street in the heart of Rocky Mount. It is one of 3 adjacent houses built by Mary Bulluck Thomas about 1901. It is a Queen Anne style home featuring varying roof lines, extensive sawn decorative detail, and unusual cut shingle sheathing on the second story. Inside there are 3 fireplaces, well preserved pine floors, and beautiful original details throughout. The current owners have lovingly cared for this charming home with meticulous attention to its interior and exterior. The floor plan features 2 bedrooms down and 2 bedrooms up , with spacious living areas and well appointed kitchen and baths Priced at $124,900. More information is available at: coldwellbanker-rockymount.com.

The historic Mary Bulluck Thomas House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

This stately Colonial Revival was built in 1928 and retains many original features.   This spacious and symmetrical home could be lived in while you make the needed repairs!  It is located within a historic district in the charming town of Eden, commutable to both Greensboro and Winston-Salem.

Area Information

The Town now known as Eden was created in 1967 from three separate towns of Leaksville, Spray and Draper. Located at the confluence of the Dan and Smith Rivers, the area has an important industrial heritage where an impressive collection of large mill buildings powered by the nearby rivers and canals, charming commercial centers, and an array of residential neighborhoods populate the bluffs surrounding the community.  Today residents and visitors enjoy bountiful recreational opportunities including greenway trails, camping, kayaking and canoeing, festivals celebrating its musical heritage including Bluegrass legend Charlie Poole, and tours. Located near the Virginia border, Eden is 30 minutes from Greensboro, 40 minutes from Winston-Salem, and two hours from Charlotte and Raleigh.

Architectural & Historical Information

The Dunn House is an exquisite example of Colonial Revival architecture in the Central Leaksville NR Historic District in Eden. It is among the few pre-war houses designed by an architect in Eden. Built in 1928 for William Oscar Jenkins, a meticulous engineer, and his wife Ruby Ivie, the house was designed by Virginia architect J. Bryant Heard. The Jenkins remained in the house for a very short period probably due to the Depression, before it was conveyed to Mrs. Jenkins’ sister Sallie Gray Ivie Dunn and her husband, attorney Adolphus William Dunn. The house remains in family ownership.

Heard’s fondness for the classical idiom is expressed throughout his body of work and in the Dunn House, which includes a classical Doric entry portico enhanced by a wide fanlight over the door and sidelites, a Doric-columned side porch and sunroom on either side all topped by a Chippendale-inspired balustrade, arched attic windows in the gables, and Flemish bond brickwork with basketweave courses along the cornice and watertable. His strong adherence to symmetry is likely the reason for two interior end chimneys with only one serving a practical purpose within. Paired doublehung windows on the front elevation provide lots of light for the interior.

The sweeping interior spaces include a gracious entry hall highlighted by a long staircase with curved newel, large openings into the living and dining Rooms, a Butler’s pantry and kitchen, and an adorable half-bath off the back hall. Three bedrooms and a full bath make up the second floor. A finished attic with full bathroom was a whimsical addition in the 1960s and is accessed by a metal spiral staircase.

A lattice-covered back porch leads to a lovely backyard where the driveway is located. A two-car garage with shed room allows for generous storage space. Though the house is habitable, it will need some minor plaster repair, interior paint, and cosmetic updates. Previous roof leaks have been repaired. Some cracks in the brickwork may indicate some foundation issues. The house was last re-wired in the 1960s and has never had a central air conditioning system. Some original light fixtures remain on-site in storage. The historic Dunn House is a contributing structure in the Central Leaksville Historic District and is eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Dunn House

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This supervisor’s home is larger than the typical mill village house, still has many original features and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by rehabbing this historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

This 3 bedroom, 1 bathroom home originally was built for a supervisor at Loray Mill in 1906.  The original clapboard has been covered, but some of the original windows remain.  Inside you’ll find the original mantels and some original woodwork. It is possible that the wood flooring is underneath the carpet.

Additionally, 313 S. Vance Street is a contributing structure in the Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District and is therefore eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits.  This historic property needs a complete rehabilitation, including updates to systems (HVAC, plumbing and wiring) as well as cosmetic updates. In keeping with our goals to revitalize the Loray Mill Village to become a vibrant, diverse and desirable place to live, property restrictions will include a requirement for owner occupancy.

Click here to see the pdf brochure for 313 S. Vance Street

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming 2 bedroom home is perfect for first-time home buyers or those looking to downsize and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by rehabbing this historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

This Type B House (see an example of a typical Type B House in the photos below) in the Loray Mill Village has been altered over time, but could once again be a mill village charmer!  Although the original clapboard has been covered and the windows replaced, there is still the original wood flooring inside, as well as some of the original woodwork.

216 S. Highland Street is a contributing structure in the Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District and is therefore eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits.  This historic property needs a complete rehabilitation, including updates to systems (HVAC, plumbing and wiring) as well as cosmetic updates.With updates to systems as well as cosmetic updates, and the re-installation of the beadboard that would have been inside, this historic property with mature shade trees on the easy-to-maintain lot will make a wonderful home once again. In keeping with our goals to revitalize the Loray Mill Village to become a vibrant, diverse and desirable place to live, property restrictions will include a requirement for owner occupancy.

Be a part of the revitalization of the Loray Mill Village! This charming 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom home is perfect for first-time home buyers or those looking to downsize and is walkable to parks, shopping, the recently-rehabbed Loray Mill and more!

Area Information

The Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District is an ideal place to call home. It is a walkable neighborhood, convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and less than 30 minutes Charlotte (even better: it’s only 20 minutes from the Charlotte Airport). The recently redeveloped Loray Mill features both residential and commercial opportunities and has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space, with future plans for a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. Preservation NC is undertaking a massive rehab project in the Mill Village, and you can be a part of it all by rehabbing this historic home!

Architectural & Historical Information

This 1904 Type A House (see a typical Type A House in the photos below) has been altered over the years, but the original floor plan remains intact. Masonite has been placed over the original clapboard and the windows have been replaced, but there are some original features inside.  Some historic woodwork remains, as well as the original mantels. As you can see in the photos, there is beautiful wood flooring in some rooms, with the possibility of wood floor under the carpeted rooms.

305 S. Liberty Street is a contributing structure in the Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District and is therefore eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits.  This historic property needs a complete rehabilitation, including updates to systems (HVAC, plumbing and wiring) as well as cosmetic updates. In keeping with our goals to revitalize the Loray Mill Village to become a vibrant, diverse and desirable place to live, property restrictions will include a requirement for owner occupancy.

Believed to be built in late 1800’s. the Walters House currently under renovation & about 75% complete-kitchen, rear foyer & lower master bedroom left to complete. Lovely large wooded lot in center of Town of Warrenton. Beautiful old Oak Trees in front yard and many smaller trees in rear. 7 Rooms with Front & Rear Foyers includes Pine & Oak floors throughout. A Fireplace or stove flue in every room, Plaster walls, Crown Molding, 10″ Moldings throughout most formal rooms & Foyers. The two-story single-pile clapboard structure has a low hip roof, bay projections & a long rear ell, fishtail shingles decorate the central gable. The windows have peaked & molded lintels. Quiet tree-shaded streets surround the Walters House.

The Warrenton National Register Historic District includes about 90% of the buildings in town. Warrenton, the county seat of rural Warren County, is a historic town with many beautifully restored 18th & 19th-century residences, fine antique shops, & comfortable bed & breakfast inns. Located in northern piedmont section of North Carolina, Warrenton retains the charm & ease of a country village. It is an hour drive northeast of Raleigh & Durham & One & a Half Hours from Richmond Va. Interstate 85 is seven miles west of town & Rt. 158 takes you towards Lake Gaston & Roanoke Rapids.

The property may be a candidate for Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits.

The historic Ward House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x 221 to request a copy of these covenants.

The Dr. John Francis Shaffner House in Old Salem is the finest example of Second Empire Style architecture in Forsyth County. Built in 1873 with an addition in 1913. Recipient of the 2011 Heritage Award, this historic landmark features original craftsmanship and details that have been meticulously restored. Fantastic space to entertain and live comfortably is enhanced by a 3-story curved staircase, 7 fireplaces, wainscoted dining room, 4-room master suite and an amazing basement with wine cellar. Main level and second floor boast 11-foot ceilings and the third floor has 9-foot ceilings. Four/five bedrooms and four full bathrooms, spacious library and large studio or gallery room.

The private yard is beautifully landscaped with an original detached kitchen building that includes a fireplace and bath; could be restored for artist studio/retreat/greenhouse or outdoor entertainment space. Oversize 2-car carport provides off-street parking. Studio apartment with separate entrance adds space for guests or tenant.

For a virtual tour, visit https://my.matterport.com/show/?m=FHiXP1itTcP&brand=0.

Old Salem, a historic Moravian settlement, is celebrating its 250th anniversary. The Shaffner House is ideally located close to the town square, Winkler Bakery, Salem College, Salem Academy, Home Moravian Church, Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts and vibrant downtown Winston-Salem.

See more at www.jack.triadlistingbook.com.

Historic Guthrie-McBane grist mill has been lovingly restored and updated to offer the perfect pairing of modern, relaxed living with the authenticity of a rich past. Set on five wooded acres in Alamance County straddling Cane Creek, the main residence was a long-time working grist mill dating back to the 1700s. A two bedroom, two and one-half bath manor features two stone fireplaces, a large kitchen, huge gathering and dining room, and private sunroom flanked by an expansive deck overlooking the creek. The master suite is a restful enclave all its own with one of the two stone firplaces. Observe Cane Creek through floor to ceiling windows of main living quarters or step onto the deck to survey nature while hearing the rhythmic cadence of water spilling over the dam. Rare 2 story log cabin on the property serves as a second home with space to house well-satisfied guests or a fortunate full-time caretaker. The quarters have their own special charm as they were impeccably rebuilt, log for log, while adding two full baths and a kitchen for modern convenience retaining rustic appeal and fireplaces.The property lends itself well to either full-time living or for use as a retreat or gathering spot. Scenic views and spacious yet cozy interiors create a peaceful retreat minutes from Chapel Hill’s University of North Carolina between the Triangle and the Triad. A genuine opportunity to step back in time, 7955 Mac Lane is not just an unparalleled estate, but a privilege to cherish. Please come for a visit. Appointment required.

See more at: http://www.hodgekittrellsir.com/eng/sales/detail/339-l-1734-9fbhvv/guthrie-mcbane-mill-snow-camp-nc-27439

150+ Acres of paradise surround this 1880s home, not lived in since about 2002, ready to be restored or have architectural details reclaimed. Over 3/4 mile road frontage encompasses land flanked by wooded acreage. Calm reservoir buffer. Unparalleled parcel enveloped in privacy with unlimited potential. Enjoy while held for future development. Create a vineyard, dream home, hunting preserve. Indulge your horses with exceptional place to live & thrive. Land & timber appraisal in hand. Acres of southern charm and character.

More information is available here: http://www.hodgekittrellsir.com/eng/associate/339-a-1734-4035268/diann-worrell

This astonishing historical property has many key details that make it stand out among the crowd. A few of them include dentil molding, original hardwood flooring, plaster walls, and a sun room. Within this two story house there are three bedrooms, two and a half baths, screened-in porch, and four door barn out back. While being in a nice neighborhood, the house is a short walk away from the post office, library and several churches. Other amenities include crystal chandelier, built in breakfast hutch, French doors, fireplace, dishwasher, freezer, and stove. Overall this property is a beautiful step back in time.

This historic property, also known as the Horton-Godwin House, is protected by covenants held by Preservation North Carolina.  To request of copy of these covenants, please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221.

Built in 1894 by Marcellus J. Best, a prominent business leader, the M.J. Best House is an important Victorian structure. Preservation North Carolina will be working to stabilize this important house and correct damage by previous owners. Its loss would have been detrimental to PNC’s ongoing neighborhood revitalization efforts. PNC has repaired the foundation and removed incompatible later additions of poor construction. We are raising funds to construct an addition that will return the house to its original size and provide space for bathrooms, closets and kitchens. We have also identified the ghostmarks of the original, much smaller porch, and we are working to raise funds to recreate the earlier porch which will restore the house to its original appearance. Here in the South, we all know that life is better on the porch. Help us “put back the porch” on the M.J. Best House by making a donation to Preservation North Carolina!

Contact us if you or someone you know is interested in purchasing this diamond in the rough.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the M.J. Best House

Charming 1950 brick home in the historical district of Mount Airy. Walking distance to town and cultural events. Spacious rooms for a large family or return to B & B. Master on main or upper level with 3 more bedrooms upstairs. Original baths with tile. Beautiful hardwoods, stairs and entry that lead to formal living and dining room. Living room with gas log fireplace. Full unfinished basement with single garage. Cozy sun porch with sitting area, gas grill and washer/dryer that stay. Landscaped yard with cherry, mulberry and walnut trees. Strawberries and grapes. Horseshoe pit.

More information and photos at www.carolinafarms.com.

Well maintained 3 bedroom 2 bath historic home located in downtown Louisburg situated on large professionally landscaped lot.

There have been many updates while still maintaining the charm of a true historical property. Upon entering you are greeted by large formal Living Room & Dining Room perfect for entertaining. The Kitchen has plenty of cabinet space with a sep. breakfast room that overlooks the fabulous backyard. Also on the main floor you’ll find two generous Bedrooms & full Bath. Take the gorgeous staircase to the second floor to find another large Bedroom & huge a bonus or fourth bedroom.

Outdoor space is abundant. From the oversized covered front porch to the lovely gardens in back. In the National Historic District & the Louisburg Historical District.

The Paul Borden House was built around 1920 and is a spacious Craftsman bungalow which has been stabilized with most of the exterior work completed!  It is only two blocks from Union Station and walkable to downtown Goldsboro businesses, restaurants and shops, and only an hour from Raleigh.  The interior is framed-in but is really a blank canvas, ready to become your dream home.

Area information

The lively town of Goldsboro (pop. 39,000) is the seat of Wayne County in eastern NC and is the home of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. It is a convenient 20 minutes from I-40 and I-95, one hour from Raleigh and New Bern, only 1.5 hours from Wilmington, and less than 2 hours to several of North Carolina’s beautiful beaches. The renovation of Union Station is underway with plans for the station to become a multi-modal transportation hub.  The station plans are scheduled to include light rail service from Goldsboro to Raleigh.

Architectural & Historical Information

Located in the Downtown Goldsboro Historic District, the house has an inviting front porch and is situated on a deep lot that includes an outbuilding behind the house.  The house features handsome Craftsman details, original brick (from the Borden Manufacturing Company), and the original slate tile roof on the front half of house (new asphalt roof with warranty on the rear).

The Paul Borden House suffered significant fire damage in 2010, and further damage from water infiltration as a result.  Major structural stabilization work has been completed by Preservation North Carolina, rebuilding the house from the bottom up.  The first floor has been framed for a living room (parlor), den/office, family room/sunroom, dining room, kitchen, half bath and master suite.  The second floor is framed for two bedrooms with good-sized closets, a full bathroom (with the possibility of a second full bathroom), and a flex space that could be a fourth bedroom.  The house requires all new systems—HVAC, electrical and plumbing—in addition to all interior finishes including drywall; flooring; stair treads, newel and balustrades; new kitchen and baths; reinstalling original interior woodwork; finishing touches on interior windows, including repairing the pulley systems; and completing work on the front porch ceiling, floor and front steps.

The outbuilding located behind the house would need to be completely rehabilitated but could be used as an additional outdoor living/play/storage space.  The yard will require significant work to address a drainage issue at the back of the house, including re-grading.

This striking bungalow is ready and waiting for you to make it your own!

Downtown Goldsboro Neighborhood Revitalization

Preservation NC has partnered with the City of Goldsboro and the Downtown Goldsboro Development Corporation to revitalize several neighborhoods in downtown Goldsboro. The neighborhoods will be transformed into a blend of residential historic structures and new homes that will include historic architectural details.

Homes range in size from 1,100 to 6,400 square feet and consist of a variety of architectural styles including Queen Anne, Victorian, and Italianate. The unique historic district includes residential and commercial structures.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Paul Borden House

Click here to view the approximate floor plans for the Paul Borden House

This is the finest house in Historic Bethania, on the largest lot in Historic Bethania. Transou house built in 1782, “frame up” restoration in 2008 using authentic historical materials. This home has the finest of appointments, modernizations, & efficiencies. Seller has $800,000+ invested in a first class restoration. Incredible price & incredible opportunity to live in vibrant Historic Bethania! Call agent for website link with more pictures & information. Truly need to tour to see all its magnificence!

Beyond authentic reconstruction of the Cooper home, an original home in Historic Old Salem. One of the largest lots in Historic Old Salem! Huge rooms, large fireplaces, lots of storage, modern construction amenities! High tech and High efficiency appointments! 4 bedrooms, 5 ½ baths.  Full separate suite in basement with 2 bedrooms and 2 baths, separate kitchen, and laundry! Ready to be finished to your specs! 80% complete, meet with agent to discuss completion schedule and price options! Seller has over $1,200,000 invested in the reconstruction to this point! Must view to appreciate!

More information and photos are available at www.siddenrealestate.com.

 

This University Park landmark has been meticulously restored above and beyond any home of this vintage. From the stunning front portico to the first floor master addition this home shouts quality and luxury. The finishes, the restored antique lighting sourced from around the globe, stunning marbles, bench made cabinetry.. no expense was spared. The choice of historically correct materials only add to the luster of this fine home. Homes such as this only come on the market once in a lifetime!

An amazing historic property that has been lovingly and meticulously restored, the Burt-Woodruff-Cooper House maintains the character of its age. Built in 1923, the stately federal two-story shows gorgeous wide-planked heart pine floors, 11′ ceilings on the main level, gracious family rooms, original oversized windows drawing an abundance of natural light, and six fireplaces (two working). The house comprises five bedrooms with potential main level bedroom or office, back breakfast room/sunroom overlooking scenic flat pastures, tin roof, two outbuildings and a barn. 3422 square feet with updated plumbing, electrical, HVAC. Option to purchase 10 acres additionally. Truly a unique opportunity!

The historic Burt-Woodruff-Cooper House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x 221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Join the revitalization of one of NC’s most walkable small town Main Streets! The historic Spencer Theater was built around 1919 and is located in the heart of Spencer’s National Register District (click here to see the National Register nomination). It is waiting on a renewed purpose and is an easy walk to nearby shops, adjoining historic neighborhoods, churches, the library and parks. The NC Transportation Museum is within view!

Area Information

Spencer is a forward-thinking North Carolina Small Town Main Street City that offers the many pleasantries and amenities of a small village atmosphere, yet it is within easy access to I-85 and larger nearby urban centers such as Charlotte (45 minutes), Winston-Salem (45 minutes), Greensboro(one hour), and Lexington (30 minutes). An Amtrak station is just 3 miles away in  Salisbury. Nearby attractions include the North Carolina Transportation Museum, Wil-Cox Pedestrian Bridge, and historic downtown Salisbury. Also nearby are several parks, including Dan Nicholas Park and Stanback Forest (also known as Spencer Woods), a 56-acre natural area with walking trails.

Architectural and Historical Information

Priced below tax value, this one story brick commercial structure with low gable front roof and stepped parapet façade was built ca. 1919 and is located in a block that is experiencing a renaissance of music-related businesses and there is plenty of on-street angled parking. Spencer’s unique alley system offers some interesting opportunities for developing this property.

The interior features highly distinctive Art Deco light fixtures, the original projection room and is laid out in a flexible way that offers many potential uses. It would make a great performance space to complement the growing music industry, an arts and crafts venue, a restaurant, or mixed use with retail and apartments. The floor plan makes for an easy transition to multiple possible uses.

The building will need a complete rehab including significant roof work, new electric, plumbing and HVAC systems as well as extensive interior rehab. It is currently eligible for the Federal 10% historic rehabilitation tax credits but could also be eligible for the North Carolina Main Street Solutions Grant or the North Carolina Department of Commerce’s Rehab Building program as well as business loan guarantees through the North Carolina Rural Center’s program.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the (former) Motor Company Building

Click here to view the floor plans for the Motor Company Building

The John A McKay House was built in 1910 next to his former factory recognized as one of the first manufacturing facilities in Harnett County. Previously a residence patterned after his grandfather’s house, this 2 story “Southern Colonial” was bought through Preservation NC and restored as a full service restaurant. Its downtown location and multi-use zoning makes this building ideal for nearly any kind of business or residence. Other than some cosmetic restoration on the 2nd floor, the magnificent building is beautifully restored and generating revenue.

The historic John A. McKay House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x 221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Historic church built in 1930, (5,136 sq ft) with a large beautiful sanctuary on the first floor, with many beautiful stained glass windows. The masonry work is excellent and there is parking in the rear. In addition to the church there is a two story parsonage next door, (2,030 sq ft), built in 1930 which is currently used as a rental. Behind the church there is a large Fellowship Hall (3,116 sq ft) with a large kitchen, storage, an office and two rest rooms. This package has lots of opportunities.

New 2016 red metal Roof *New 2016 windows * Tankless water heater* New sump pump* Newer HVAC units*Rare opportunity – circa 1870 farm house on the National Register. ‘Kinchen Holloway House’ 1573 restored sq ft w/2 BR/1.5 BA*living rm w/built-in bookcases*formal dining*heart pine flrs throughout*eat-in kitchen*4 working fireplaces*screened porch*beautiful patio that overlooks Eno State Park land that surrounds two sides of property*walk to the river*flrd attic provides storage*A must see on 1.79 acres*

One of a kind historic home in gated golf course community w/beautiful mountain & golf course views & immense charm sited on 5.1 acres. Complete renovation, large rooms, high ceilings, wood & tile floors, multiple fireplaces, wonderful eat-in kitchen, formal dining room, custom built-ins, butlers pantry, 2 Master Suites, 4-season room, office/study, wrap-around porches, patios, detached guest cottage, beautiful massive barn & garages for 5 cars.

Beautifully updated & appointed, the Garland-Buford house holds an incredible place in NC history. Built c. 1832, this fine country home has 2.37 acres of beautiful landscaping; boasts intricate wood workings inside & out by Master Craftsman Thomas Day; and was used as a Civil War hospital. Beautiful English kitchen with granite counter tops, stainless appliances, custom cabinetry and stone flooring. Original heart-pine flooring throughout most of house. Dining, living & family rooms. Two enormous central halls. Modern master bath has cast-iron, roll-top bathtub and historic replica fixtures. Amazing stairworks. Swimming pool, hot tub, porches & decks, detached pool house/office and wired workshop. Featured in Country Living, Money, and Smithsonian magazines. Also, don’t miss our Open House from 3-5 p.m. Sunday, August 30. 3 bedrooms, 2 ½ baths, 3,744 sq.ft., 2.37 acres, $412,000.

Follow Lisa Dye Janes on facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/LisaDyeJanes

Find additional information on the Garland-Buford House here:  http://www.searchallproperties.com/listings/2114272/4 840-Solomon-Lea-Road-Leasburg-NC

Haven’s Mill is a scenic waterfront property located on the Historic Waterfront in Washington, NC. The property consists of 1.34 Acres with approximately 330 feet of bulk head, deep water frontage along the Pamlico River. Zoned B1H the site can accommodate many uses that would complement the historic buildings located thereon.

The historic Haven’s Mill (1928) is a multi-story facility with panoramic views of historic downtown, the waterfront and the river. With much of the original equipment inside the Mill is an ideal facility for redevelopment into a residential structure, brewery or restaurant or a mixed use facility with retail and residential. The unique structure hosts beautiful woodwork and old mill equipment that harken to a time of a bustling waterfront busy with commerce. Room for boat slips on the waterfront adds to the functionality and utility of the site for many future uses.

The property also has a beautiful waterfront house (1875) that is in excellent condition and could easily be renovated to a true showplace in Washington. The views are excellent and the access to downtown shopping, restaurants, the waterfront park and neighbors make the home a tremendous attribute to the overall site.

Other buildings include the station on Main Street which is an ideal location for a gift shop, ice cream parlor, candy store and or many other retail uses. There is an old boathouse onsite adjacent to the Mill which could be incorporated into the renovation of the mill and utilized by future residences of the property. There remains extra land on the site to accommodate parking, access and future development to enhance the utility of the site for the next owner.

Whether you want landside access or you come by boat, The Haven’s Mill Property provides many excellent opportunities for a future development. Put your imagination to work and envision an exciting development on Washington’s Waterfront that will incorporate the historic significance of the property and its buildings and offer unique amenities for future users.

Click here for a flyer with more information on the property.

Every so often the opportunity comes along to purchase of historic gem. The Liberty Point building in Downtown Fayetteville is a 4,500+ SF brick structure built circa 1791 and was the location of the signing of the Liberty Point Resolves, a predecessor to the Declaration of Independence. The building has been restored to its former glory and is currently used as office space. Its downtown location and proximity to the courthouse make it ideal for many professional uses particularly law firms. The first floor has entrances on both Person St and Bow St. Each floor has numerous private offices, conference rooms, and restrooms. There is also a finished (unheated) attic above. The property and Liberty Row were added to the National Register of Historic Places in August 1973 (Reference #73001331).

The Liberty Point building is located in historic Downtown Fayetteville where Person St and Bow St meet. It is adjacent to the Cumberland County Courthouse and surrounded by many restaurants and retail. There is on-street parking on both sides of the building as well as pay per house surface lots nearby.

More information at www.GrantMurrayRE.com

The Pippen House is a true architectural masterpiece located in the Historic District on Tarboro’s picturesque Main Street. This small, welcoming community in eastern North Carolina offers a lot for a small town: fishing or paddling on the Tar River, playing nine holes of golf or enjoying a great meal downtown.

The grand interior of this 5 bedroom, two-story Victorian home has spacious rooms, marble and slate fireplaces, beautiful moldings, heart pine floors, period light fixtures/chandeliers, built-ins, sunroom, 4 covered porches, patio, and fenced backyard on an 0.86 acre landscaped lot. This property is ready for you to move into and apply your personal touches at your own pace.

The Pippen House, also known locally as the Pippen-Staton House, is without question the finest example of post-Civil War Victorian Italianate architecture in Tarboro and the surrounding region. Built by William Mayo Pippen (1830-1889), this large old mansion, unofficially known locally as “Pippen’s Palace”, sits on an unusually large lot which originally encompassed the entire block. Its elaborate design and similarities to the few other comparable North Carolina houses, especially in Raleigh, strongly suggest that G.S.H. Appleget was the architect and builder. He was one of North Carolina’s leading architects just after the Civil War, having moved to the state in 1869 after a successful career designing buildings in New York, Philadelphia and other large northern cities. Appleget houses, if they still remain, are often the largest and finest of the Victorian houses in the older, wealthier towns and cities of central and eastern North Carolina.

Mr. Pippen, a wealthy merchant and planter, bought the original 2-acre lot on Main Street in September of 1879 from John L. Bridgers, owner of the nearby Blount-Bridgers House. Although the public tax records indicate construction in 1874, this does not appear possible or likely based on the lot purchase date. The house is shown clearly on Gray’s Map of Tarboro, published in 1882. Based on this information, the best construction date, assuming a two-year building period, would be circa 1881. William Pippen died in 1889, and his wife, Mary Harrison Powell Pippen, passed away in 1897. Just after the death of Mrs. Pippen, the property was acquired by another prominent Tarboro citizen, Henry L. Staton, a respected local attorney, and remained in his family well into the second quarter of the 20th century.

The exterior of the house which has magnificent detailing was carefully and thoroughly restored in 2014, including: repaired slate roof, replaced standing seam roof, replaced built-in gutters and downspouts, repaired or replaced soffit, modillions, arched windows, and all trim work on house and porches, repaired and reglazed all windows, removed all lead-based paint, documented original paint colors and striped, sanded, primed and painted the exterior. There are four porches with handsome and bold chamfered posts with brackets and ornamental, molded and applied tops. Balusters are equally bold and have the look of crafted urns. The use of decorative bulls’ eyes, baluster pilasters, modillion blocks, dentil work and assorted applied woodwork can be found in abundance on all sides of the house. Of particular significance are the projecting bay windows where all of these elements are incorporated into a stunning display of Victorian decoration. Window tops are arched, and unusual, delicate flower petal round windows are found in the gables.

The front doors are the most exceptional in the region. It is hard to describe the high level of detailed woodwork, with the beautiful rectangular, cut glass inset panels of floral swirling designs. Above the double doors are two equally detailed tear drop transom windows with the same beautiful, early Art Nouveau etched patterns – all in perfect condition. Another major architectural feature of regional prominence is the multi-patterned, polychrome original slate roof that features flower designs and patterns in varying colors of slate.

Upon entering the ornate, etched glass double doors, one immediately sees one of Tarboro’s most beautiful and gracefully curving staircases, with a massive multi-sided newel post and turned balusters. Almost all of the rooms in the house, including the stair hall, have their original, early electric chandeliers. Behind the stairs is a great small space or inglenook for quiet contemplation. The stair hall becomes narrower behind the stair case and leads through the entire house, and provides access to a small half bath with one of the greatest period sinks to be found anywhere and to a wonderful smaller room perfectly suited for use as a home office. Extensive storage closets and cupboards line the hallway to the back of the house.

Downstairs there is the magnificent front parlor with an intricately carved Eastlake marble mantel made with both black and brown stone. The huge chandelier is silver plated, and all of the floor length windows have their original or very early plantation shutters. This is true of all windows in the original portion of the house. The front bay window is large enough to accommodate a grand piano, and between the two side windows is the original, ornate black Eastlake pier mirror that has always been in that location. The mirror has always conveyed with the house. Very large, heavy and molded plaster cornices and large foliated plaster ceiling medallions are not only in the formal parlor, but throughout most of the downstairs rooms. The same is true of the etched, pattern glass transom windows over each doorway.

Behind the parlor is the former gentlemen’s parlor with its original black stone mantel with its curved firebox and the original, very ornate chandelier. Although the room is currently in use as a dining room, it could have a variety of uses, such as a more informal den or library. Behind the former gentlemen’s parlor is a massive room with a large bay window. An opening to the beautiful north porch is just to the east of the bay window. This was the original dining room, and is of a size for large-scale entertaining. This room is adjacent to the very large kitchen located at the rear of the house.

On the south or right side of the stair hall is a large downstairs bedroom with adjoining full bath. This room also has a large bay window facing south and another handsomely carved marble mantel. This one is white with simple detailing. Again, heavy plaster crown moldings and a large ceiling medallion adorn this room as in all of the other major downstairs rooms. The south side of the house also has a large and expansive side porch accessible from several rooms.

Upstairs are three bedrooms. Two have attached full baths. The large windows in these rooms have unusual arched tops, and with the number and size of the windows, all of the bedrooms have superior lighting and great views of the beautiful yard and massive magnolia trees below. The mantels in the three upstairs rooms were unfortunately removed at some point, but could be replaced with simpler wooden mantels of the period.

The yard of this Victorian mansion is enormous to be in the center of Tarboro. It is well known throughout the region for the huge magnolia trees that totally surround the house on all three street sides of the property. This offers an unusual degree of privacy for such a large house in town. A low brick wall also defines the property on all sides.

The Pippen House is within both the locally protected Tarboro Historic Zoning District and the Tarboro National Register Historic District. As a contributing structure in a National Register Historic District, costs for appropriately renovating this single family residential structure may qualify for a North Carolina income tax credit. For income producing properties, such as a bed and breakfast inn, a Federal tax credit is also possible.

Please visit our website at www.tarbororealty.com for additional information and pictures regarding this property.

The DT Ward house was constructed circa 1901 on farmland in Tyner, NC. The Ward family lived in the house for approximately sixty years. They built a small brick house next to the farmhouse; costs of heating & maintaining the big house had become more than they could handle. The 2300 square foot farmhouse sat unoccupied for forty years. DT Ward’s daughter in law kept a watch on the place and was said to have chased away looters with a shotgun more than once. The original house was completely intact when Preservation North Carolina obtained the house in the late 1990’s. It was moved & restored by contractors Alex Klausmann & Delouis Wilson. The house retains its original framing, windows, doors, flooring, ceilings, stairs, and trim, but has new up to date mechanicals and electrical systems. The DT Ward house has been featured twice in This Old House magazine.

The historic D. T. Ward House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

READY FOR OCCUPANCY!

Renovation is complete for this two-story Italianate house designed by noted New Jersey architect G. S. H. Appleget. Built in 1885 it is located on a prime downtown corner lot surrounded by lush, historic landscaping. An older cabin already on the property and dating from the early 1800’s was used as the kitchen connected by a breezeway and is still part of the house today and is itself possibly the oldest structure in Mount Olive. During most of the 20th century, the house was owned by Mr. and Mrs. Robert Peele Holmes. Mr. Holmes founded the North Carolina Camellia Society and created new varieties still growing on the grounds today.

The house features fine details including a bracketed cornice with double drops, original 2-over-2 windows, paneled wainscot, 4 original mantels with metal surrounds, original molded handrails, balustrade with turned balusters, a turned newel post and decorative scroll work. The center hall floor plan features a living room with fireplace, dining room with fireplace, master bedroom with fireplace and private bath, laundry room, half bath, a large kitchen/den/breakfast room and a mud room on the first floor. The upstairs has a spacious hall and three large bedrooms, each with a fireplace. There are two full baths and two half baths, one each upstairs and downstairs. Most of the flooring in the two-story Italianate is original heart pine except for main hallway and master bedroom, which are 1920-era tongue-in-grove oak. The back part of the house is floored with 1880’s era recovered tongue-in-grove oak from the old Northeast FW Baptist church. Work includes:
– Exterior painting complete.
– All interior painting complete
– All floors sanded and refinished
– Completely new electrical wiring though out
– New upstairs and downstairs heating and a/c units and ducting
– 95% new plumbing (original fixtures retained where possible)
– Original: wood paneling and molding, staircase, newel post, balustrade with balusters, fireplaces, mantels, wood floors, doors, windows, etc. have been retained everywhere possible and refinished. Missing or broken elements replaced in kind
– Rotted or damaged structural members and siding have been replaced.
– New roofing (replaced shingles with shingles)
– The fireplaces are not safe for use and are NOT being repaired in the current rehab effort.

Area Information

Mount Olive is the second largest town in Wayne County and located just south of Goldsboro. At the last census Mount Olive boasted 4,756 residents, but the population within a 10- mile radius is approximately 35,000. Beaches, museums, historic sites, state parks, the Civil War corridor, and the capital city of Raleigh are within easy driving distance. Each year on the last full weekend in April, Mount Olive celebrates its agribusiness heritage with the NC Pickle Festival – one of the best-known festivals in the state. For more information on the area, visit www.townofmountolivenc.org or www.waynegov.com.

The historic Flowers-Wooten-Holmes House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Constructed approximately 1800, just before the bridge to Harkers Island. Neighborhood boat ramp easily accesses Bogue sound, with a short boat ride to Shackleford Island national park island and Beaufort Inlet. Income-producing property through VRBO, see listing #413888. Renovation essentially complete. 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, full width front porches on first and second floors, screened back porch. Nice opportunity to have a beach house with proven income.

The historic Chadwick House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Calling for creativity! This quaint but spacious church situated in the restive sandhills region among native longleaf pines would make a perfect artist retreat or weekend getaway.  Located only about ten miles from Pinehurst and Southern Pines, it could offer the best of both worlds for those who enjoy the peace and quiet of a “country” location, with all of the amenities offered by the nearby resort towns. Click here for examples of churches that have been used for renewed purposes.

Area Information

The quiet location of the church in Addor (now Pinebluff) is located in the Sandhills, an area formed by ancient sand dunes that divide the Piedmont and Coastal regions of North Carolina.  It is only about ten miles from Pinehurst and Southern Pines. Pinehurst, known as the “Cradle of American Golf”, is home to the famous Pinehurst Resort, The Country Club of North Carolina, numerous outdoor activities including golf, tennis and equestrian events, boutique shops, excellent restaurants, art and pottery galleries, and much more. Southern Pines also offers many modern conveniences, as well as historic attractions (such as the Shaw House and Weymouth) and a charming main street. Addor is less then an hour from Fayetteville, and just under two hours from Charlotte.

Architectural and Historical Information

This late-19th century church was constructed around the time the new town of Keyser was established on the Raleigh to Augusta Airline Railway around 1880. The name was changed to Addor in 1918.

The church has sustained a few changes during its long history including the addition of shingles and replacement front doors. The interior remains largely open space with wood floors, diagonal tongue and groove wainscot, and an octagonal apse on a raised platform, separated by a railing supported by turned balusters, and topped by a tongue and groove ceiling covered in brilliant blue paint. This rear section may have been added in the early 20th century.

Decorative features are simple yet attractive including variations of tongue and groove wainscot, ceilings, and a striking towers featuring pointed arch vents, metal shingle roof covering and an octagonal spire.

The Free Liberty Church will require a compete rehabilitation including all new systems and some restoration carpentry.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Free Liberty United Church

The Old Gibsonville School is an excellent opportunity for redevelopment as condos, positioned perfectly within Alamance County’s booming housing market and only 17 miles from downtown Greensboro and 40 miles from Durham. Constructed in 1924 in the Colonial Revival-style, the Old Gibsonville School is a stately two-story building situated in a park-like setting on the edge of Gibsonville’s quaint downtown and a mile away from Elon University. Designed by Burlington architect Gustav Larsen, the school initially consisted of the front five bays with a stair tower at either end. Two-story wings were added in the 1930s creating a U-shape plan and an inner courtyard. The school was remodeled in the 1960s with metal windows and a more streamlined façade while retaining the classical front entrance with broken portico and urn finial. Another two-story wing was added to the rear north wing. There is a partial basement under the south side of the main building.

Several original features remain on the interior including wood floors, transom windows over several of the classroom doors, closets with doors that open vertically, plaster walls, and bathroom and water fountain fixtures on the second floor.

The school originally served children in first through eleventh grades. Kindergarten and 12th grade was added later. From 1973 until it closed in 2006, only the first floor was used for elementary school grades.

The building will require a complete rehabilitation including structural repairs, new roof, all new mechanical systems. The roof of the rear south wing has collapsed. The school is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and is ideal for market-rate residential or other uses compatible with the adjacent new elementary school.

Click here for Old Gibsonville School floorplans and the site plan

Area Information

Gibsonville, known as the “City of Roses”, is a friendly, family-oriented community located in the Piedmont Triad area of North Carolina, between Greensboro and Burlington and within close proximity to Elon University. With an estimated population of 6,706, Gibsonville offers a small town atmosphere to live, work, play, and raise a family while providing quick access to larger neighboring cities. The Town provides a variety of services such as police, fire protection, garbage collection, recyclables collection, water, sewer, streets, sidewalks, planning, parks and recreation, senior citizens programs, library, and cemetery. [Taken from http://www.gibsonville.net/ ]

Hillman Barnes built this fine Greek Revival house around 1860 to replace a c.1830 house lost to fire. In 1919 Barnes’ grandaughter Nellie and her husband moved the house on logs to adjacent land carved out for them. They added the present two-story rear wing and updated a few of the fireplaces to more fashionable Craftsman mantels. The right front parlor remains the most original.

The house displays a variety of interesting achitectural features including mortise and tenon construction, wide overhanging eaves, corner fluted pilasters and molded caps, six over six windows with wide beaded architrave and molded backbands, and a fine six-paneled door with transom and sidelights. The entire house is covered in a well-maintained standing seam metal roof.

The house sits on land very near I-85 that is being developed into a corporate park and must be moved within the next few months.

Please click here to see a pdf brochure of the Hillman Barnes House

The McCollum Farm is a remarkably intact early 19th century tobacco farm situated in the rolling foothills of Rockingham County between Madison and Wentworth. The property was part of the 18th century holdings of the Yours Family, early settlers on Jacob’s Creek, a tributary of the Dan River comprised of rich bottomland. One of the Yours daughters married James McCollum in 1807 and the land has remained in the family.

The original tall two-story log house is thought to have been built in the 1820s, but could be earlier according to some historians. It is constructed of hand hewn square-notched logs. A one-and-a-half story addition of similar construction was built in the 1840s next to the earliest section creating two rooms on the first floor separated by a center hall. A two-room rear ell was added to the back of the 1840s section around 1904 creating even more space. Additional exterior features include fieldstone chimneys with brick stacks, a later front porch, and a generous porch on the rear ell. The back porch behind the earliest section exhibits flush siding in an enclosed work space and remnant early clapboard siding that once protected the entire exterior.

The 1820s interior features an elegantly detailed Federal mantel, a primitive post-and-lintel mantel on the second floor, a winder staircase enclosed by a finely crafted board-and-batten door, and an interesting closet under the stairs with a board-and-batten door secured by an early intact wooden rim lock. Remnants of lime wash remain on the walls. There are two rooms on the second floor. Greek Revival-era details include hand-planed two-panel doors and simple post-and-lintel mantel in the parlor.

Early outbuildings include a rare log slave house and a log smokehouse with dovecote and wooden salt trough. The slave house and smokehouse are thought to be from the early 19th century. In May 2014 the McCollum Farm log slave house was included in The Slave Dwelling Project, an organization committed to identifying and assisting in the preservation of extant slave dwellings. http://slavedwellingproject.org/about-the-slave-dwelling-project/

The log house will require extensive rehabilitation in the 1820s section including foundation work and new flooring, ceiling repair, and the installation of mechanical systems including electrical, plumbing and HVAC. The 1840s side with rear ell is habitable, but will benefit from cosmetic updates and possibly some system upgrades. A fire in 2006, which started on the second floor of the 1840s side and spread to the attic, resulted in the replacement of the roof, and loss of much of the original clapboard siding, the flush gable ends and boxed cornice. The metal roof is new, but the house would benefit from restoration of some of these original elements including the boxed cornice and gables. The fire also damaged the original enclosed winder stair case in the 1840s section which was replaced by a standard straight staircase. The door connecting the two sections has been enclosed by drywall on one side, but can easily be re-opened as the two-panel Greek Revival door remains on the other.

The house and some of the outbuildings are available with five acres of land. More property is available at an additional cost. The house is currently being rented. The house was added to the National Register Study List.

Area Information

The quiet rural nature and charming small towns belie the dynamic cultural, historic and recreational opportunities in beautiful Rockingham County. From rolling agricultural landscapes, quaint historic villages and museums to music festivals, shopping, and exciting water sports on any one of four rivers, the area has something to offer everyone. The McCollum Farm is located between the towns of Madison to the west (just off US-220) and the county seat of Wentworth to the east. Greensboro is just 30-minutes to the south.

Click here for a pdf of the McCollum Farm approximate floor plans

Click here to see the pdf brochure for the McCollum Farm

Built in 1937, this 1-1/Story Neoclassical Cottage is located on a small, secluded lot in the Tarboro, NC Historic District. Tarboro is Located only 1-hour from Raleigh and 1/2 hour from Greenville, NC. Tarboro is well-suited to convenient living in a small, historic community with many cultural, historic and civic amenities.

The Moore House is considered to be a significant and contributing property to the historic district. The neighborhood is very quiet, and although the house has a Main Street address, it is not visible from Main Street.

The house has approximately 2,000 SF. When renovated in 2007, the interior was modified to “open up’ the house, improve interior circulation and make it more suited to modern living for either retirement or for a small family.

The first floor has an enclosed front porch, living room, with working fire place, new side porch, dining room, kitchen/utility closet, mechanical closet and master bedroom/bath suite with two large closets and French door access to the side porch. The bathroom has a large double jacuzzi, large walk-in shower, double vanity and enclosed toilet and has imitation-stone tile floors.

The second floor contains two large bedrooms with walk in closets. The larger of the two bedrooms also has a separate sink/vanity. Each bedroom has generous storage space under the front attic, on each side of the dormer windows, and in the rear attic. The bathroom has a porcelain tub, subway-style tile on floors and walls, vanity and toilet.

The detach storage building is used as a workshop.

The house was completely gutted and renovated in 2007 by the present owner, preservation Architect Richard Andrews, AIA. Exterior work included removal of aluminum siding, repair/repainting of wood clapboard trim and replacement of the roof shingles. Interior work included the replacement of insulation with 1” of closed cell polyurethane and 3-1/2” of fiberglass batt, new gypsum board, period doors, and refinishing of wooden floors. The kitchen has been completely remodeled with new cabinets, granite countertops, appliances and the addition of a large bay window for greater natural illumination. All plumbing, heating/cooling and electrical systems were replaced. The heating/cooling system is a high-efficiency dual-fuel heat pump with gas back up. The air filters are the electrostatic type which require little maintenance. Air handling units are located in closets for easy access and service. Utility bills average less than $200/month.

Find more information at www.tarbororealty.com

 

Built in 1845, the Oliver House is one of only 4 raised cottages in Caswell County. It is located in the quaint town of Milton and was fully restored in 2005 according to the Secretary of Interior’s Standards and PNC protective covenants. Built for a local merchant during the time when “cotton was king,” the Oliver House is located just a block from the Thomas Day House/Union Tavern and just 2 miles from VIR (Virginia International Raceway). Since it’s restoration, the now 2 bedroom house has been used as a guest cottage and/or private residence. The Oliver House has all the amenities of a modern home with a lot large enough to build a sizable workshop or garage, subject to approval by PNC.

 The historic Oliver House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

A Wayne Rigsbee restoration in the historic district of Louisburg. Ready to move in now. 2850 sq ft with all hardwoods, 3br, could be 4 br. 6 fireplaces, new wiring, plumbing, roof, detached garage, playhouse,custom millwork, new 16 X 24 deck, concrete drive, landscaped.  For additional info and to arrange a showing, please contact Tommy Twitty CCIM at Barrett Realty.

The historic Collie-Best-Taylor House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x 221 to request a copy of these covenants.

 

Unique 3-story inn in picturesque Mayodan!  Situated in a prime downtown location near the scenic Mayo River, the Mayodan Hotel has played a prominent role in town with its origins as a modest two-story home to the Lewis family and gradually evolving into its current 26 rooms. Archival photographs, extensive history, floor plans, and a hotel feasibility study are available to assist in a rehabilitation project.

Area Information

Mayodan is located in the northern Piedmont area in the Mayo River Valley, just north of its confluence with the Dan River. The former mill town’s roots can be seen in the many historic mill village houses and quaint downtown commercial area. Manufacturing still plays an important role in Mayodan, as it is home to Bridgestone Aircraft Tire, Remington Arms and Sturm, Ruger, & Co. have announced that they will begin production of firearms in Mayodan.  The town is convenient to the Triad cities, only about 45 minutes from Winston-Salem and Greensboro and less than an hour to the “Furniture Capital of the World,” High Point.  About 30 minutes away is beautiful Hanging Rock State Park, and less than an hour away, you’ll find the Sauratown Mountains, both of which offer miles of trails with waterfalls and beautiful vistas.

Architectural & Historical Information

Since its origins as a modest two-story house, the Mayodan Hotel has been central to the history of this picturesque River town. The house and over 300 acres was sold in 1891 by the Lewis family to the Piedmont Land and Manufacturing Company which would develop the area into a town to support its Mayo Mill operation. During this period, the property would serve as the first post office, a boarding house, and site of services for the Moravian Church until its construction. By 1912, the property was known as the “Mayodan Hotel” and had greatly expanded to include several more guest rooms, dining services, and a double front porch. The third floor was added by 1920. Owned by Washington Mills for many years, the property was sold to the Holt family in 1955 who continued to rent out rooms until the 1990s.

For many years the Mayodan Hotel has served as a hub of community activity and the site to many important local functions and visits by notable North Carolinians. Its historical use as a hotel can once again become a reality as new industry and recreational tourism in the area grows and demand for hotel rooms increases. The potential exists to transform this 3-story Victorian-era inn into a boutique hotel, bed and breakfast inn, and/or special events/catering facility. Built in several stages, the building has over 6,000 square feet and 26 rooms and 4 bathrooms. The main section has three stories with two-story wings. The building is in good structural condition and would benefit from an updated heating and air conditioning system, removal of asbestos shingles and repair of clapboard siding underneath, restoration of the 3-story porch, and re-working some of the existing rooms to accommodate additional bathrooms for overnight lodging purposes. Archival photos and floor plans are available to assist with the development of rehabilitation plans along with a hotel feasibility study demonstrating a need for an increase in local overnight lodging facilities and special events venues.

The Mayodan Hotel is located within a National Register Historic District, and is therefore eligible for both federal and state historic rehabilitation tax credits. There may also be the opportunity to take advantage of local financial incentives.

Click here to view the floor plans for the Mayodan Hotel

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Mayodan Hotel.

Click here for more information about the Mayodan Hotel

Click here for a copy of the feasibility study

The Old Sunbury High School Gymnasium building is in overall very good condition. A small portion of the building is currently rented and used as a retail bakery. There is a large storage area w/garage door & other rooms used as storage. Room for an office and the original Boys & Girls locker rooms remain. New HVAC installed. Unlimited potential for this unique building. Conveniently located close to Elizabeth City NC, Suffolk and Franklin VA.

Additional details at: http://www.williamewood.com/lindalewis

The Sunbury High School Gymnasium is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Be part of the renaissance of the Loray Mill Village!  With the redevelopment of the Loray Mill, these mill houses are a prime opportunity for first-time home buyers or those looking to down-size.

This modest 1900’s bungalow style home has 3 bedrooms and 1 bath on a corner lot with plenty of room for those just starting out or empty-nesters who want to live smaller but near modern conveniences.  The property requires a complete rehabilitation including carpentry and cosmetic updates, new electrical, HVAC, and plumbing along with updates to the kitchen and bath.

This mill house is a contributing structure in the Loray Mill Village National Register Historic District.  The home is located 2 blocks from Garrison and Franklin Boulevards in Gastonia and within walking distance to the new park/playground constructed by the Gastonia Optimist Club.  It is convenient to shopping, restaurants, I-85 and Charlotte.  The Loray Mill redevelopment project (only two blocks away) will feature both residential and commercial opportunities.  The Loray Mill has 100,000 square feet of commercial retail space with a targeted tenant mix consisting of a brewery, café, restaurants, fitness and spa, dry cleaners, neighborhood market and other complimentary services. In keeping with our neighborhood revitalization goals, property restrictions will include a requirement for owner occupancy.

 

The Smithwick-Green-Clark House is one of a few surviving early nineteenth century farmhouses in Martin County.  Constructed around 1800 for John Smithwick, it retains much of its original transitional Georgian-Federal character although it has undergone two periods of change.

The first changes occurred in the mid-nineteenth century when the original detached kitchen was moved and a new kitchen ell constructed on the south side of the house. However, it was the changes made during second remodeling or Colonial Revival phase, made around 1914 by owner John Mack Green, which changed the structure most. A generous wrap-around porch with Tuscan columns replaced the original front porch; doors with sophisticated elliptical panes and single pane transom replaced the original doors; large one-over-one sash windows were installed on the facade; and a third (final) kitchen ell was constructed on the rear of the house.

Replaced, but not all removed, many of these original elements, such as the nine-over-nine sash windows, can be found in the 1914 addition.  The earliest portion of the house retains much of its original Georgian-Federal woodwork, including eight-raised panel doors, an original thumb latch and H-and-L hinges, four original mantles, flat-panel wainscot accented with ovolo-molded chair rails and two-part beaded baseboards, an enclosed winder stairway, and most of the door surrounds and flooring.  The house features a large wrap-around porch and a smaller screened-in porch.

In addition to an old well on the site, there is now public water to the property going to the shed behind the house.  Several of the older six-over-six and nine-over-nine windows on the back of the house have been repaired.  Some removal of outdated cabinetry and appliances has occurred in the kitchen, and painting was begun to the older section of the house.  The house still requires a complete rehabilitation, including updated electrical, plumbing and HVAC.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Smithwick-Green-Clark House

Click here to view the floor plans for the Smithwick-Green-Clark House

The Gabriel Johnston Hotel, (c.1935) in downtown Smithfield, is the last of Smithfield’s old hotels. A late 1930s interpretation of the Federal Revival style is evident in the stone splayed keystone lintels over the windows and Flemish-bond brickwork. It has Art-Deco style shallow pilasters. From 1963-1998, the three-and-a-half story hotel served as town offices. The building was purchased in 1999 by its current owners, who completed work including the replacement of the roof, interior demolition, and asbestos abatement; however, the building still requires extensive rehabilitation.  Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, there are many financial incentives for rehabilitation available. This building would make an ideal mixed-use facility with downstairs restaurant and office space and inn rooms or apartments on the upper floors.  Property includes 40+ parking spaces.  For more information and additional photos: www.downtownsmithfield.com/index.php/available.  A 2011 feasibility study is available at www.downtownsmithfield.com/images/property-PDFS/HotelGJreport.pdf.

Built in 1893, this two-story brick building is the oldest building in downtown Laurinburg’s historic district. First known as the Central Hotel and later Hotel Dixie, its proximity to the railroad greeted passenger train visitors arriving from Wilmington or points further inland. It served the African American community as a hotel and boarding house through the first half of the 20th century and from 1959 until 1996 was the location of popular local restaurants.

Area Information

Laurinburg was incorporated in 1877, but settlers first set down roots here in 1785. Currently, it is the county seat of Scotland County, and a three-time All America City located in the Sandhills region. Laurinburg offers the charm and quiet living of a small southern town with close proximity to larger cities (only 40 miles from Fayetteville and Fort Bragg), the mountains and the coast. Developing from its rich agricultural heritage, Laurinburg is still an agricultural community and it is also the progressive business and cultural center of Scotland County. Laurinburg is also home to St. Andrews University and the Laurinburg Institute. It is about 30 miles from some of the country’s best golfing in Pinehurst and Southern Pines and in less than 2 hours, you can be in Wilmington, the Uwharrie National Forest or Charlotte!

Architectural & Historical Information

What the Old Central Hotel lacks in ornamentation it makes up for in sturdy masonry construction and a commanding view of the busy seat of Scotland County. The two-tiered wood porch shades the welcoming entry into a large open space that until recent years catered to diners (and even a pool hall or two). Large windows on the front first story let in plenty of light, while windows along the sides and second floor are six over six wood sash. The tall parapet roof rises higher in the front elevation than the sides where it gradually steps back lower into the roof line. Recessed panels between two bands of brick corbelling along the cornice line provide exterior ornament. Window openings are topped by well-executed flat arches. The entire building rests on a stuccoed masonry foundation.

The interior includes a generous space on the first floor for dining/gathering with smaller areas toward the back for kitchen/service activities and two guestrooms. Walls are primarily plaster with a few beadboard partition walls. The main dining hall has been covered with wood paneling during a later remodeling. In the back of the building beyond the wood stairway hall are two former guestrooms, entered through paneled doors with transoms above, the larger room with a fireplace and mantel. A wood staircase with simple yet sturdy newel posts and balustrade leads to the second floor with several guestrooms and a couple of bathrooms. The second floor rooms are arranged on either side of a central hall leading from two rooms in the back toward the front of the building with a door leading to the porch. Most rooms have transoms above wood-paneled doors.

The Central Hotel will require a complete rehabilitation including all new mechanical systems, repointing, paint, and cosmetic upgrades. A later side addition will probably need to be completely re-done. The Central Hotel is a contributing structure in the National Register Historic District and is positioned for a variety of creative uses including restaurant, inn, retail or office.

 

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Old Central Hotel

Beautiful 1938 W.P.A.-constructed school building located on 4 acres in Lansing off Highway 194 in Ashe County. Constructed from the same quarry stone as the Blue Ridge Parkway, Lansing School served as both elementary and high school for the County until 1952, when the high school moved into a newly built brick structure on the grounds. The hub of activity in Ashe County for five decades, the school was built when Lansing was a logging town during the time of the Virginia Creeper Railroad. The town of Lansing is a 5-minute walk from the school and is undergoing a revitalization in the commercial district with new businesses, restaurants and organic farming operations.

The main school building which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places is 18,000 square feet with an interior cleared of walls down to the studs. The original windows and floors are still intact. The two-story structure sits on top of a hill overlooking the American Legion ball fields, which were formerly the school fields and connected via a pedestrian tunnel that runs under Hwy 194. There are plantings of several grape vineyard rows on a portion of the front lawn.

A new roof was installed in 2006, electricity and a bathroom added in 2017.
At this time, prefer to sell the upper portion of the building to raise money to restore more of the bottom floor and the other two buildings on the property. The price of the upper floor is negotiable. It is structurally intact and dry; however, it is in need of major work including repair of existing (possible replacement) windows, insulation, electricity, HVAC, and a new exit. Willing to consider seller financing with a substantial down payment.

Price is negotiable.

 

Spacious historic Greek Revival home with Colonial Revival details with 5 bedrooms, 4 bathrooms, plenty of living space and also a partial basement. Beautiful new full length front porch, original bay windows, 8 fireplaces, original wide plank hardwood floors, double hung windows and many other original features. Double lot that is approx 1 acre, also has a small outbuilding that can be used as a workshop or potting shed.

Built in 1853 for J.J. Baker, owner of Goldsboro’s first metal foundry. Local stories recall that the Baker children sat on the front wall and watched Union soldiers march into Goldsboro shortly before their home was commandeered as the headquarters for General Gordon of Sherman’s Army in 1865.

Home has some major exterior renovations completed:

  • restored foundation
  • standing seam metal roof
  • front porch added to mimic original size and style
  • exterior painted
  • subfloors added in kitchen and bath
  • several other major projects

Interior renovations are still needed prior to move in, including kitchen, bathrooms, and all major mechanicals (electrical, plumbing, heating/AC).  Exterior work still needed includes repairing the windows and replacing several broken panes, and addressing carpentry issues, at minimum.

This home is located in downtown Goldsboro, and is part of the revitalization of downtown. Please visit http://dgdc.org/master_plan.apsx for full details on Goldsboro’s Master Plan of the Greater Downtown Goldsboro area. This home is close to many quaint shops and restaurants in the downtown area. This is a great opportunity to get a beautiful historic home at an affordable price – whether this be for a family home or investment, prices will be going up in this neighborhood as many other families and Preservation North Carolina are actively involved in restoring this great town!

The historic J.J. Baker House is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Interior photos below were taken prior to the start of rehabilitation work.

 

 

Branch Grove is the marriage of a 1790s Georgian and a larger Federal, Tripartite home. The Tripartite dwelling, built in 1848 by Samuel Warren Branch; is the birthplace of Alpheus Branch, the founder of Branch Bank (BB&T). It has a characteristic cross­hall plan with Federal­ style woodwork. When complete: 3 BR, 2­1/2 Baths, eat in kitchen, formal dining room, separate master suite and interior back hall joining both homes. Interior features: two­-story central foyer, 6 working fireplaces, stunning front porch true standing seam metal roof, and original wood floors, moldings, flat-panel wainscoting, windows and doors throughout. Downstairs master suite with large porch, en­suite and private sitting area. Windows are nine­-over-­nine sashes on 1st floor and six­-over­-nine sashes on 2nd floor. Restored by Andrus Corporation, an award-winning preservation construction company. Details include high-end finishes and attention to Preservation covenants making this restoration in a class by itself. Restoration will be complete summer 2018. . Perfect for personal or vacation home, small farm, event venue and more. “Like” our page and follow the progress on Facebook – “Branch Grove historic restoration and 40 acres”

Branch Grove is under protective covenant held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants, or click the Protective Covenants link below. 

Area Information

Halifax County, designated in 1759, is one of the oldest counties in North Carolina with a rich history dating back to the earliest days of European settlement of North America.  Over the years, Halifax County has provided North Carolina with more leaders—governors, congressmen, generals—than any other county in the state.  Located about 10 miles away is Historic Halifax, a state historic site with 8 beautifully restored historic sites and an archaeological site open to the public.  Minutes from I-95, and only a short drive from the NC coast, Enfield offers a variety of recreational pursuits as well as easy access to industrial and corporate centers.  For more information about Halifax county or the town of Enfield, visit www.halifaxnc.com and www.enfieldnc.org.

 

Click here for Branch Grove Floor Plans

Click here for Branch Grove Parcel Map

Click here for Branch Grove Septic

Click here for Branch Grove Finishes by Room

Click here for Branch Grove Mantel Colors

Click here for Branch Grove Protective Covenants

This stately side-hall plan home was built between 1840-41 by William Hollister, one of New Bern’s most successful merchants in the early nineteenth century.  Individually listed on the National Register, the Federal-style home retains most of its historic details including seven impressive mantels, arched doorways, detailed moldings, and many beautifully carved window and door surrounds.  Since the property is on the National Register, it is eligible for historic rehabilitation tax credits.

Area Information

New Bern was founded in 1710 and is the second oldest town in NC. Two beautiful rivers meet in New Bern (the Neuse and the Trent), where you’ll find Tryon Palace, spectacular gardens, historic homes, quaint shops, cozy restaurants and lively entertainment, frame downtown streets. Farther south, you can enjoy MCAS Cherry Point and the 157,000 acre Croatan National Forest, nationally recognized for its trails and recreation opportunities. New Bern has big-city amenities with small-town charm, and is about 2 hours from both Wilmington and Raleigh.

Architectural & Historical Information

The first floor includes a double parlor connected by pocket doors, and then a dining room and kitchen in the wing.  The second floor has two large bedrooms joined by double doors.  There are two bathrooms on the second floor which will need to be redesigned.  The third floor has another bedroom and a room which was used by Hollister’s daughter as an artist space.  There are 11′ ceilings on the first floor and 12′ ceilings on the second floor.  The home also has a dry basement.  The property is located on a nice corner lot with off-street parking and several well established trees.

Although the side-hall plan of the house was a typical New Bern home, there are modern elements (for that time) that were likely introduced with Hollister’s business dealings in New York and Boston.  As noted in Catherine Bishir’s book Crafting Lives, craftsman working on the house included “carpenters” and “negroes” and free artisans Hardy B. Lane Sr. as lead contractor, white carpenter Robert Hancock, black carpenter William H. Hancock, and black painter Ben Wade.

The Hollister House requires a complete rehabilitation including all new systems.  The house has been rewired and ductwork installed for the HVAC on the first and second floors.  Some rehab ideas include adapting the existing dining room into a contemporary kitchen, creating a mud/laundry room and small powder room in the existing kitchen, and using the south parlor as the dining room.  On the second floor, rehab ideas include removing the bath on the landing of the second floor and updating the remaining existing bathroom.  On the third floor, rehab ideas include adding a bathroom in the room above the existing second floor bathroom.  Additionally, buyers may wish to construct a free standing garage behind the house where an earlier garage once existed.

The historic Hollister House will be sold subject to protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina.

Click here to view the pdf brochure of the William Hollister House

Click here to view the existing floor plans for the William Hollister House

The modest-sized side-hall plan Traylor-Peacock House was built in 1895 and has three bedrooms and two baths. The property includes an adjacent lot bringing the total land to 0.24 acre.

The inviting front porch expands the width of the house with original posts and sawn decorative balustrade. The multi-gabled roof features decorative shingle work. Interior features include a single-run original stairway with turned balustrade, original mantels, and wood floors.

The Traylor-Peacock House must be lifted from its foundation for repairs and likely needs sill replacement/repair as well. The house requires a complete rehabilitation including all new systems, wiring, HVAC, plumbing, roof (repairs at minimum) and new kitchen and baths. It has been confirmed that the property contains lead paint. The Traylor-Peacock House is a contributing structure in the Goldsboro historic district.

Area information

The lively town of Goldsboro (pop. 39,000), the seat of Wayne County, is the home of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. It is located in eastern North Carolina, 20 minutes from I-40 and I-95, one hour from Raleigh, and within easy access of North Carolina beaches

Downtown Goldsboro Neighborhood Revitalization

Preservation NC has partnered with the City of Goldsboro and the Downtown Goldsboro Development Corporation to revitalize several neighborhoods in downtown Goldsboro. The neighborhoods will be transformed into a blend of residential historic structures and new homes that will include historic architectural details.

Homes range in size from 1,100 to 6,400 square feet and consist of a variety of architectural styles including Queen Anne, Victorian, and Italianate. The unique historic district includes residential and commercial structures.

Click here to view the brochure for the Traylor-Peacock House

Click here to view the approximate floor plans for the Traylor-Peacock House

Click here to see some possible design ideas for the Traylor-Peacock House (a Meredith student project)

The Lentz Hotel, erected in 1853 and moved from its original site at the center of Mt. Pleasant in 1980, is the oldest commercial building still existing in Cabarrus County. The board-and-batten exterior is supported by a timber frame of Chestnut and reflects the “bracketed mode” of construction, made popular by American architect Andrew Downing Jackson (1815-1852). This “Carpenter Gothic” style includes brackets under especially wide eaves, vertical board-and-batten sheathing, and heavy lentels over the windows.  The seven mantels and the staircase are of the Greek Revival tradition. The exterior siding is cypress, interior walls are pine, and the floors are made of heart pine planks. Built by W. R. Scott, the property (known as the Mt. Pleasant Hotel) was sold to John Lentz in 1863 for the sum of $1,350 in Confederate currency. The Lentz family operated the Hotel for over sixty years, spanning three generations. In 1911, an outside set of stairs was added so the upstairs rooms could be used by the female students of Mont Ameona Seminary after the school burned (it was considered unseemly for girls to walk through the downstairs rooms where men could be present).

The Lentz Hotel was the social center of Mt. Pleasant during the last quarter of the nineteenth century and the first part of the twentieth century. In fact, it was “famous for parties and social events”. Much of the Hotel’s prosperity came from the town’s dual role as a trading and educational center. The Hotel was sold outside the Lentz family in 1926, where it changed hands several times. Over the years, the Hotel served as a tenant house, with the condition of the house gradually deteriorating. Early in 1980, the building was slated to be demolished, to make room for a new building on the existing lot, which was on the town square. Mt. Pleasant Insurance Company, working with preservationists, looked at other options. The Historic Preservation Fund of North Carolina, assisted by the Daniel J. Stowe Foundation, moved the building to its current location on College Street, where it was restored to its original prominence by master craftsmen and renovators. The Lentz Hotel was individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

Only twenty-five minutes from Charlotte, enjoy small-town living with big-town amenities close by. Be sure to check-out the website (www.lentzhotel.com) to see much more information and photos regarding the many features of this unique property. The Hotel was sold outside the Lentz family in 1926, where it changed hands several times. Over the years, the Hotel served as a tenant house, with the condition of the house gradually deteriorating. Early in 1980, the building was slated to be demolished, to make room for a new building on the existing lot, which was on the town square. Mt. Pleasant Insurance Company, working with preservationists, looked at other options. The Historic Preservation Fund of North Carolina, assisted by the Daniel J. Stowe Foundation, moved the building to its current location on College Street, where it was restored to its original prominence by master craftsmen and renovators. The Lentz Hotel was individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1984.

The historic Lentz Hotel is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

The Hicks-Broom House is a late 19th century home with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths. A center hall plan with a metal-clad roof, the house is situated on a deep spacious lot. The inviting front porch expands the width of the house and has original posts and sawn decorative balustrade.

The interior of the house has some original features including wood floors. The house requires a complete rehabilitation including all new systems, wiring, HVAC, plumbing and kitchen and baths. The house is located in the Goldsboro historic district.

Area information

The lively town of Goldsboro (pop. 39,000), the seat of Wayne County, is the home of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. It is located in eastern North Carolina, 20 minutes from I-40 and I-95, one hour from Raleigh, and within easy access of North Carolina beaches.

Downtown Goldsboro Neighborhood Revitalization

Preservation NC has partnered with the City of Goldsboro and the Downtown Goldsboro Development Corporation to revitalize several neighborhoods in downtown Goldsboro. The neighborhoods will be transformed into a blend of residential historic structures and new homes that will include historic architectural details.

Homes range in size from 1,100 to 6,400 square feet and consist of a variety of architectural styles including Queen Anne, Victorian, and Italianate. The unique historic district includes residential and commercial structures.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Hicks-Broom House

Click here to view the floor plans of the Hicks-Broom House

This turn-of-the-century Colonial Revival home is on a double lot just two blocks from the city’s main square.

The stately all-brick residence has six bedrooms, a sleeping porch, four full baths, and five fireplaces. In addition to 4,700 square feet of heated living space, the home has a full attic and basement that bring the total interior size to more than 10,000 square feet.

Interior details include hardwood floors throughout, beautiful stained original moldings and trim, pocket doors in the front formal rooms and transom lights on doors on the second floor.

The house was built for Dr. and Mrs. Henry Fletcher Long on property adjacent to the hospital founded by Dr. Long. The house was completed in 1914. Because the family’s first home was destroyed by fire, the Longs insisted that this house be “fireproof,” with features including 12-inch solid brick exterior walls, a slate and metal roof, 8-inch thick interior walls that were covered in concrete before plaster was applied. An independent appraiser has calculated that it would cost $4,299,076 to duplicate the house today. (Replacement cost insurance is surprisingly affordable at $1,726/year however.)

Also on the property is a 22′ x 34′ three-car garage that was first built as a carriage house. Another 14′ x 28′ building on the site dates from the late 1800s and was used as an ironing house for the hospital laundry. Other buildings on the property include a 12′ x 14′ smokehouse, and an 18′ x 24′ single-car garage.

An expansive courtyard at the back of the home is said to have been paved with the bricks from the foundation of the original family home, which burned.

In 1959, the Longs’ youngest son, Dr. Robert Long, DDS, bought a portion of the property and operated a dental practice there. That 1,500-square-foot building remains. After the death of his mother, Robert Long purchased the residence from the estate and lived there with his family until his passing in October 2004.

These properties are held by the Dr. Robert Long Trust and are being offered for sale as a single unit.

The Long House Property is under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Conveniently located, the Bryan-Stanton-Holmes House is an attractive Victorian cottage with well-preserved architectural details.

Built in 1901 by Bela Bryan who occupied the house until 1936, the house was owned by the Stanton family until 1963, and then by the Holmes family until 2006. Its long history of owner occupancy was then altered when it became a rental property. The house underwent unfavorable changes at that time but many of the architectural elements are still in good condition.

A typical 1901 Victorian home, the woodwork is characteristic of the period. The wood floors and three Victorian mantels are in fairly good condition, and the large four-over-four windows flood the home with light.

Located on North Virginia Street in Goldsboro’s Historic District, the Bryan-Stanton-Holmes House is one of six properties adjacent to one another within the neighborhood plan. The property is also less than two blocks from the historic Union Station which is in the process of being restored in a NCDOT project set to re-establish it as a transportation hub, providing rail service to Raleigh and the coast.

The exterior of the house has been significantly modified. The new owners will want to remove the brick facing and restore the original Victorian style porch. The Bryan-Stanton-Holmes House probably originally resembled the Nettie B. Taylor House and could be returned to that Victorian cottage style. The roof needs to be replaced, and rebuilt in one location at the back of the house.  Having been vacant for several years, the new owners will need to update the mechanical systems—including electrical, plumbing, and HVAC—as well as create a modern kitchen and baths.  There is termite damage in the house.

Area information

The lively town of Goldsboro (pop. 39,000), the seat of Wayne County, is the home of the Seymour Johnson Air Force Base. It is located in eastern North Carolina, 20 minutes from I-40 and I-95, one hour from Raleigh, and within easy access of North Carolina beaches.

Downtown Goldsboro Neighborhood Revitalization

Preservation NC has partnered with the City of Goldsboro and the Downtown Goldsboro Development Corporation to revitalize several neighborhoods in downtown Goldsboro. The neighborhoods will be transformed into a blend of residential historic structures and new homes that will include historic architectural details.

Homes range in size from 1,100 to 6,400 square feet and consist of a variety of architectural styles including Queen Anne, Victorian, and Italianate. The unique historic district includes residential and commercial structures.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for the Bryan-Stanton-Holmes House

Historic Glencoe Village Mill house…This lovingly restored and renovated home reflects the true character of the 1880’s while embracing all of the conveniences of today. Featuring original and reclaimed heartpine flooring, beaded board, clapboard walls, wideplank doors, aged patina walls, rocking chair porches, exposed beams, 3 fireplaces and more.

Fantastic cooks kitchen with granite countertops, center island with country sink, stainless appliances, gas range, wall oven, 2 drawer dishwasher, refrigerator and microwave. Huge gathering and dining room with triple french doors out to the screened porch…Perfect for all of your entertaining, intimate dinners or an afternoon nap.

Private master suite with clawfoot tub, vintage vanities, cozy fireplace and warm heartpine floors…a wonderful retreat. The home has 3 bedrooms and 2 baths.

Beautiful grounds surround the home with mature landscaping…featuring herbs, perennials and ornamentals. There’s even an “outhouse” turned garden shed! The partial basement is perfect for crafts or a workshop and the patio is a great place to relax in the heat of the day.

Come out to Glencoe Village and tour this special home, wander down the streets, visit the shops and museum, explore the walking trails along the Haw River or kayak along it’s banks.

This is a great place to call home…make it yours today!

All historic homes in the Glencoe Mill Village are under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

One last lot is available for new infill construction in historic Glencoe Mill Village. Decades ago, three historic village homes were burned for fire practice leaving three vacant lots on the upper side of Hodges Street. Help complete the streetscape with this final lot available for infill. The infill house next door was selected as Country Living magazine’s house of the year in 2002.

Located in Glencoe Mill Village, described by the National Park Service as “a nationally significant site representative of the Southern textile mill village and its role in the industrialization of the American South.”

Preservation NC purchased the derelict mill village, 32 vacant houses in varying conditions of decay and a complex of mill buildings along the river, in 1997. Since then, Glencoe has been transformed into a vibrant community of restored historic properties in a picturesque riverfront setting.

Parts of the property have been returned to parkland, and the mill complex is now undergoing a full renovation. It’s an exciting time to be in Glencoe, and this is the last chance to build a new dreamhouse there.

All historic homes in the Glencoe Mill Village are under protective covenants held by Preservation North Carolina. Please contact Dawn Williams at dwilliams@presnc.org or 919-832-3652 x221 to request a copy of these covenants.

Click here to view the brochure for Glencoe Mill Village Lot 29

Thought to have been built in 1807, The Fountain is a two-story frame house with a full attic. The house was expanded between 1865-70 with a kitchen and dining room ell. Alterations made during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries have given the home Federal, Greek Revival and Queen Anne interior and exterior features.

The Fountain was home to five generations of the prominent Davenport-Jones family. Currently with four bedrooms and two baths, the site includes a brick well house/dairy built sometime between 1865-70. The original basement kitchen is one of only a few such nineteenth century kitchens surviving in western North Carolina.

The Fountain has suffered deterioration over the years but many significant repairs and updates have been made and the house is livable. The home has well water, a septic system and an oil forced-air furnace. The property is individually listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The house is in a rural setting and the backyard leads to a stream, but it is also in close proximity to schools, shopping and other amenities.

Click here for an article from The North Carolina booklet: great events in North Carolina history, which provides information about The Fountain and its builder.

Area Information

Lenoir is a North Carolina Main Street community located on the Highway 321 corridor midway between Charlotte and Boone. Rich in natural beauty, it also has a strong tradition in visual and performing arts. It is less than thirty minutes from Blowing Rock and the Blue Ridge Parkway and a nearby state historic site, Fort Defiance, which was an important Revolutionary War site. Google recently opened a site in Lenoir, creating over 200 jobs. To learn more about the area, visit www.explorecaldwell.com or www.caldwellcountync.org.

Click here to view the pdf brochure for The Fountain

Click here for The Fountain floorplans